CAMPAIGN CRAFT: PORTFOLIO; Barry Brand

A few years ago they didn’t exist. Now any creative department worth its weight in salt has a head of advertising design like WCRS’s Barry Brand. ‘I oversee all the press and poster work here,’ he explains.

A few years ago they didn’t exist. Now any creative department worth its

weight in salt has a head of advertising design like WCRS’s Barry Brand.

‘I oversee all the press and poster work here,’ he explains.



Brand continues: ‘Head of typography would be too narrow a description

of my position, it’s a far bigger job than that. However, it’s not head

of art either, because I don’t tend to get involved with commercials

shoots.’



A graduate of the London College of Printing, where he studied design

for print, the 31-year-old Brand has worked as a typographer at many of

London’s top agencies, including Bartle Bogle Hegarty, Simons Palmer

Denton Clemmow and Johnson and Young and Rubicam. And wherever he’s

worked, he’s tried to push the possibilities of typography, elevating it

from an also-ran to a creative medium in its own right.



Brand moves fluently from hi-tech to low-tech, unleashing the latest

post-modernist typefaces from his Apple Macintosh, but commissioning

traditional signwriters if the job demands it - as with the Simons

Palmer client, the National Railway Museum.



‘There are a flood of exciting new typefaces on the market,’ he

explains. ‘Even so, I tend to tinker with them to make them my own.’



A campaign for Jose Cuervo tequila, for example, gave Brand a rare, but

legitimate, opportunity to unleash Priska Little Creatures - an off-the-

shelf typeface consisting of fish, fowl and curious anthropomorphic

characters.



A recent fold-out press ad for Orange allowed him to go wild with mutant

type, which was outputed on to transparent cels and then photographed

under coloured gels. This level of typographic expression is rare, but

the kind of challenge he relishes.



WCRS’s head of advertising design is increasingly applying his knowledge

of type to commercials, researching the do’s and don’ts at post-

production houses such as Rushes and the Mill. ‘It’s still a neglected

area,’ he maintains.



It’s no wonder Brand has such a broad job description.



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