CAMPAIGN CRAFT: PORTFOLIO; Sandra Goldbacher

Looking at Sandra Goldbacher’s moody, stylised showreel, it is hard to believe that this is the director responsible for two boxing documentaries, and a gritty 90-second film in Channel 4’s current Broke series about a 17-year-old Birmingham chambermaid who at night sleeps in a tiny Citroen car.

Looking at Sandra Goldbacher’s moody, stylised showreel, it is hard to

believe that this is the director responsible for two boxing

documentaries, and a gritty 90-second film in Channel 4’s current Broke

series about a 17-year-old Birmingham chambermaid who at night sleeps in

a tiny Citroen car.



But a closer look at the lush ads on the reel, and not least the work

for Sheridan’s and Northern Rock, betrays a fascination with narrative

substance as much as with style. ‘It’s nice to create a certain look,’

Goldbacher says. ‘But I do like working with performers, building

characters and creating stories. The feature projects I’m working on,

for example, are relationship-based and certainly not visual

extravaganzas.’



Goldbacher, having progressed from art school at Middlesex Polytechnic

to the National Film School, started out as a documentary film-maker.

She was hired by the BBC after graduating and worked on arts

documentaries for two-and-a-half years. Then came the boxing films for

Channel 4, one of which was set in a Sheffield gym and included footage

of a young Prince Naseem Hamed, now a world champion.



The break into commercials directing came with a move to Propaganda, and

then a switch to Rose Hackney Barber at the beginning of 1996. ‘I

definitely see commercials directing as what I do now and if and when

feature projects happen I think they’ll help my commercials work.

Commercials work is a great opportunity to experiment with different

looks,’ Goldbacher says.



Goldbacher is currently shooting a Hedex ad for Ogilvy and Mather, which

is the first overtly humorous script she has tackled, although there was

plenty of visual humour in the series for Radio Times that made it on to

her reel. ‘It’s nice to do something funny. I really don’t want to get

pigeonholed as a good stylist or as someone who can handle domestic

drama, which certainly can be a factor for women directors.’



Other new directing projects include feature films - she had a 20-minute

short at last year’s London Film Festival - and writing more

commercials’ scripts.



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