CAMPAIGN CRAFT SPONSORED BY SVC: CRAFT SECRETS - How monsters and cavegirls united in BBH’s Lynx TV spot. Attention to detail ensured the success of the B-movie parody, Jade Garrett writes

When Bartle Bogle Hegarty hired the American special effects expert, Tom Rainone, to work on its latest commercial for Lynx body spray, it probably got more than it bargained for. ’I can’t stand these Jurassic Park movies. Your target market won’t understand the One Million Years BC idea, they’ll just end up comparing it to Spielberg and we’ll lose the satire,’ Rainone said in his first meeting with BBH creatives.

When Bartle Bogle Hegarty hired the American special effects

expert, Tom Rainone, to work on its latest commercial for Lynx body

spray, it probably got more than it bargained for. ’I can’t stand these

Jurassic Park movies. Your target market won’t understand the One

Million Years BC idea, they’ll just end up comparing it to Spielberg and

we’ll lose the satire,’ Rainone said in his first meeting with BBH

creatives.



Rainone, who was approached and employed by the agency while on holiday

in London, pointed out that the monster design would have to lend itself

to stop-motion animation if a 60s B-movie style was to be achieved.



The ad tells the story of a backpacker who is captured by a tribe of

stone-age beauties. His Lynx spray has the desired taming effect on the

women, until a two-headed monster appears and ruins the fun.

Unsuccessful attempts by the women to slay the beast with spears prompt

the hero to use one of the beauties’ bras as a catapult. The monster is

defeated - the women have discovered a new monster-slaying technique and

they remove their bras to practise. (The spear-throwing scenes were

written into the script to make the women appear more proactive.)



Rainone worked with the director, Andy Morahan - then represented by

Great Guns, Morahan now works through Paul Weiland - and the animator,

Dave Allen, of Honey I Shrunk the Kids fame, to design and animate the

two-headed monster. The commercial aimed to imitate the styling of a 60s

B-movie while retaining a 90s feel to give the spot the tongue-in-cheek

image associated with the ’Lynx effect’ that was introduced in BBH’s

previous two commercials for the brand, ’house party’ and ’dream

date’.



Six weeks were spent designing the monster, which is operated by a

system of flexible ball and socket joints inside a clay mould.



A specialist bone artist was employed to ensure authenticity.



Animation took a further six weeks. In reality, the monster stands at

about one foot high and 16 inches long.



Scouts spent two months trawling the US to find a suitable location and

finally decided on the San Diego desert.



The tribal village took a day and a half to build. Filming took place on

a dry river bed which meant that the weather was a crucial factor - any

heavy rain would have washed the set away. Five days of shooting were

followed by three months in post-production at the White House.



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