CAMPAIGN DIARY: I’M ONLY A PUNTER BUT

I recently enjoyed an evening out with my wife - and away from the children - to see the Jackie Chan comedy-thriller, Rush Hour, which was rated ’15’.

I recently enjoyed an evening out with my wife - and away from the

children - to see the Jackie Chan comedy-thriller, Rush Hour, which was

rated ’15’.



Settling down in the comfortable cinema seats, we were assaulted by that

interminable BBC film where a child walks through numerous scenes from

classic BBC children’s programmes.



We endure him meeting Postman Pat and Bagpus, as well as visiting other

children’s TV shows.



It is explained the BBC can make such programmes because of the unique

way that the BBC is funded by ’big people’. At only five-and-a-half feet

tall, am I then exempt?



I sat silently seething. I have already endured this film on TV so why

is the BBC wasting public money to screen this advertisement in the

cinema?



Am I supposed to rush out and buy an extra TV licence to give the BBC

even more money? Or perhaps lobby politicians to raise the fee to pay

for such ads?



Will ITV respond with a similar film - including scenes from Magpie,

Tiswas, Do Not Adjust Your Set and The Muppet Show - promoting its

unique system of funding children’s TV programmes from ad revenue?



I think it would be nice to remind people that the ITV children’s

series, Do Not Adjust Your Set, featured Michael Palin, Terry Jones and

Eric Idle before they became Pythons. Another cast member was David

Jason.



The film may be technically brilliant and will no doubt win many

creative awards. But if the BBC is so against advertising, why run the

film as an ad in the cinema?



Unlike ’Perfect Day’, which could just be enjoyed for the music and the

visual effect, while you ignore the message, the BBC children’s film is

simply irritating.



Send your rants to Diary Editor, Campaign, 174 Hammersmith Road, London

W6 7JP.



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