CAMPAIGN DIARY: I’M ONLY A PUNTER BUT ..

Call me a scrooge if you like, but what exactly is happening to Christmas? The next time you’re watching television at home, walk out of the room during the commercial break and listen to the ads. They are all the same. ’This Christmas, why not drop into ’big warehouse-type retailer ...’.’

Call me a scrooge if you like, but what exactly is happening to

Christmas? The next time you’re watching television at home, walk out of

the room during the commercial break and listen to the ads. They are all

the same. ’This Christmas, why not drop into ’big warehouse-type

retailer ...’.’



They are all hoping to palm off some of their outdated stock on to

desperate shoppers who apparently haven’t an idea in their heads. Isn’t

there something wrong here? I mean, who falls for this? Someone

must.



Not only am I sick of all the Happy Christmas-type bollocks that keeps

appearing on our screens, but also the rubbish these retailers are

trying to peddle.



I saw an ad in a national newspaper the other day from a well-known

retailer, all lovingly crafted with holly, snow, a few stars and loads

of tacky products all being sold off cheap. And what were they trying to

convince me to buy for Christmas presents? Why, a washing machine, a

cooker and a freezer. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but aren’t these gift

items guaranteed to result in an immediate divorce?



It’s time for the retail industry to wise up: you can’t sell a Christmas

shopper any old rubbish. The reality is that we consumers know roughly

what sort of things we want to buy our friends and family: nice things

that are fun and maybe useful or decorative. So why are retailers

convinced they should try and flog vacuum cleaners, fridges and

cookers?



We don’t want them for Christmas - we only buy them reluctantly at the

best of times.



So my message to Christmas retail advertisers is: be realistic, save

your money, don’t advertise stuff you know you wouldn’t buy your

mother-in-law (save it for the January sales, that’s when we want it)

and at least make the ads look vaguely decent (and ditch the holly and

stars).



But, as ever, research will prove me wrong, no doubt. But that’s another

rant ...



Send your rants to Diary Editor, Campaign, 174 Hammersmith Road, London

W6 7JP.



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