Campaign Hall of Fame: The ads that influenced the power brokers - Opinion formers and style leaders tell Campaign about the ads they think have changed society for the better. Compiled by Caroline Marshall

For a magazine which has banged on rather a lot about advertising having a commercial purpose, it may seem surprising that Campaign is devoting two pages of this special issue to showcasing the issues and worthy causes that advertising has promoted - politics, public health, race and disability awareness and so on. After all, the cynics would say that agencies rarely make money on such accounts, using them instead to raise their corporate profile by being associated with power and ’good works’.

For a magazine which has banged on rather a lot about advertising

having a commercial purpose, it may seem surprising that Campaign is

devoting two pages of this special issue to showcasing the issues and

worthy causes that advertising has promoted - politics, public health,

race and disability awareness and so on. After all, the cynics would say

that agencies rarely make money on such accounts, using them instead to

raise their corporate profile by being associated with power and ’good

works’.



Nonetheless we knew it would be illuminating to ask leading opinion

formers to reflect on advertising by picking an advertisement which

tackles social issues, and which they feel affected public opinion, or

their opinion.



Our aim? To show that at a time when spin-doctoring and grass-roots

activism have eclipsed advertising as the preferred tool, that

advertising still has enormous power to effect social change. And, as

with all power, to remind ourselves that it needs to be informed by

social responsibility.



The choices are, obviously, contentious; another group of opinion

formers would have picked a different set of advertisements. And, thanks

to Piers Morgan, the editor of The Mirror, it is somewhat painful too.

For Morgan argues that the advertisement he has chosen, ’demon eyes’,

changed opinion in the opposite to the way intended.



The list of contributors includes traditional keepers of power as well

as some of society’s newer and more ephemeral king-makers. We have a QC,

a poet, a style magazine editor, two leading film-makers, two charity

campaigners, a style guru, a society photographer, a tabloid editor, two

politicians and a world-class sportsman - all, in their own ways,

advocates as well as opinion formers. As a thank-you to each

contributor, Campaign is donating pounds 100 to a charity of their

choice.





I believe in positive advertising. While some of the hard-hitting ads

are excellent, I nevertheless feel that a lot of people turn away from

distressing pictorial images. The Kitchener advertisement was positive,

memorable, gained tremendous response and the results remain plain to

see.



Clarissa Baldwin is chief executive of the National Canine Defence

League



’Lord Kitchener wants you’ was more like a public service communication

than an ad, but it moved more people than anything I can remember. It

has remained with us - as a lasting image that my children would

probably recognise. As an image it was incredibly optimistic. It didn’t

give the impression of what lay ahead and yet it took people to their

death. In effect it was selling what the military strategists had

concluded, that some young men had to die to achieve the greater

good.



Eric Fellner is co-chairman of Working Title



Surely it must be the Kitchener recruiting poster of 1914, ’Your King

and Your Country Need You!’ Because it influenced so many young men to

sign up. Because it probably won the First World War while losing an

entire generation who, to misquote Wilfred Owen, ’died as cattle’ and

thus changed society forever. What other advertising campaign and slogan

has been remembered for so long?



Brian Patten is a poet



’Kitchener’ is not my favourite advertisement, but it is the one that

has had the most lasting impact on the history books - it captured the

sense of need and duty that sent so many young men to the trenches.



John Redwood is the Shadow secretary of state for environment and

transport



This was a stark and simple image. It brought the message home on both a

personal and political level. Its impact was entirely visual and did not

depend on any text. Consciences could hardly avoid being troubled by the

exploitation of animal life for the benefit of a wealthy, whimsical

fashion world, and it worked - the fur trade was severely damaged.



Michael Mansfield QC is a lawyer for the Stephen Lawrence family



Unlike most of the advertisements which your contributors will choose,

the Conservative Party’s ’demon eyes’ had the extraordinary effect of

hardening public opinion against the people who paid for the ad. The

idea that Saint Tony could in any way be the devil, as the poster

portrayed him, was so laughable and ridiculous that it merely confirmed

to large numbers of the public that the Conservatives had lost all touch

with reality.



Attacking Blair on a personal level was a disastrous own-goal for the

Tories and this advertisement personified the strategy at its worst.



Piers Morgan is the editor of The Mirror



The decision to use a poem as part of a charity advertisement was a very

strong idea, it succeeds in conveying the ineffable private grief of

losing a baby, while at the same time being clear that this is a public

problem and what can be done about it.



Geordie Greig is the editor of Tatler



I would like to nominate the latest Teacher Training Agency

advertisement, ’flight’, because it captures the wonder of learning and

the skill and imagination of a teacher. Also, in advertising teaching,

this is a commercial that brilliantly sells something which is truly

brilliant, rather than just brilliantly saleable!



David Puttnam is a producer, educational activist and Labour peer



Abram Games’ style is now very out of date and most of his clients were

organisations we’d rather not know about: the Army, the War Office,

Festival of Britain and so on. There’s something queasily nostalgic

about public service advertising at mid-century and at his worst Games’

poster designs are very clever visual puns executed in a handwriting

that is utterly distinctive. Games, the last master of the drawn

lithograph, had a personal adage about ’maximum meaning, minimum means’.

The charm of his work lies in its ability to evoke a less complicated,

more wholesome age. There’s a universe of choice, but a personal

favourite is a poster Games did in 1975 for the Royal Shakespeare

Theatre Centenary Appeal, a fine example of a brilliantly simple graphic

concept which is true to the spirit of its subject and has real

evocative power. Looks good too.



Stephen Bayley is an author and design consultant



This tremendously impactful advertisement has remained with me since I

saw it. I thought at the time, and still think now, that it was a

milestone in the way society confronted the issue of drugs. The

unvarnished truth, boldly stated, seems to me to be the strongest

advocate in persuading young people to reject drug use.



Steven Berkoff is an actor and writer



In a fraction of the time it takes to explain to someone how different

perceptions and reality can be, this immaculately directed piece of work

crystallised the thought, and demonstrated the importance of

distinguishing between the two. I should think it encouraged a

generation of liberal thinkers.



Terry O’Neil is a society photographer



I have selected the Live Aid ad because it was part of a huge change in

the way that the public responded to famine and suffering.



During the Ethiopian disaster, other media played a more significant

part in mobilising public opinion - for example, the Live Aid concert

itself and the immensely moving television footage - but I remember this

advertisement, and thinking how it had found its role. It gave voice to

one of the enduring legacies of that time, which was the creation of a

climate in which people had the confidence to know that a small act

undertaken, such as buying a book or watching a pop concert, was capable

of achieving an enormous effect, when replicated by many people. ’Do

what you can, with what you have, where you are,’ was how Roosevelt

styled it. This ad was one of our generation’s expressions of the same

thought.



The Duchess of York founded Children in Crisis



Why ’Labour isn’t working’? Above all because an attention-grabbing and

intelligible picture was accompanied by a simple and memorable

message.



Posters should be designed to ’insert’ in people’s minds a parrot-like

slogan - ’Guinness is good for you’, ’walls have ears’ - as memorable as

ITMA entry lines (I’m beginning to show my age!).



Lord Howe served as a Cabinet minister for all but the last three weeks

of Margaret Thatcher’s 11 years in Government



Coca-Cola advertisements have always embraced the global market in a

very touching way (eg, ’I’d like to teach the world to sing’) but this

advertisement, which ran during the Coca-Cola Cup in 1997, impressed me

by its direct inclusion of a group who may well have felt excluded by

advertisements showing healthy athletes performing at the highest

level.



Top golfer Colin Montgomerie is the ’British Ambassador of Sport’,

according to The Sun.



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