Campaign Hall of Fame. (Part 2 of 2)

1. CADBURY’S SMASH MARTIANS BMP.

1. CADBURY’S SMASH MARTIANS BMP.



Year: 1974

Title: Martians Client: Cadbury’s

Agency: BMP

Art director: John Webster

Writer: Chris Wilkins

Director: Bob Brooks

Production company: Brooks Fulford Coutts Seresin



Who doesn’t remember the ditty ’For mash get Smash’ and the endearing

family of Martians who marvelled at the curious potato-eating habits of

primitive earthlings? The ad broke every rule in the book by showing

robots eating the product, but its depiction of a rather cuddly future

proved a huge hit with consumers. The Martians were an immediate success

and as more of the family - including the cat and the dog - were brought

into the plots, fan mail poured into the agency to such an extent that

it had to prepare special literature to send out in reply. Mrs Smash was

distinguished from Mr Smash by a pinny, hat and handbag - all in

metallic silver, of course. The space-age theme was just right for the

mid-70s and Smash became market leader despite heavyweight competition

from Mars with its Yeoman and Wondermash brands. While Yeoman was

boasting about its blend of potato varieties, the Martians were

persuading housewives to serve Smash more often by implying that this

was the way the world was going - eating instant food was natural,

modern behaviour that Martians would take for granted.



Rather than showing the product as artificial, it was compared with food

of the future, such as tablets, while the ’old-fashioned’ act of peeling

potatoes provoked much hilarity. Such was their enduring popularity that

the metallic-voiced Martians made not one but two comebacks, in 1992 and

in 1999, and the brand still enjoys more than 50 per cent market share

today. A worthy overall winner.





2. GALLAHER IGUANA COLLETT DICKENSON PEARCE.



Year: 1978

Title: Iguana

Client: Gallaher

Agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce

Art director: Alan Waldie

Writer: Mike Cozens

Director: Hugh Hudson

Production company: The Alan Parker Film Company



Created by the legendary Alan Waldie during the golden years of Collett

Dickenson Pearce, this classic piece of surrealism inspired many a

creative director who, on first seeing the ad at the cinema, vowed to

get into advertising. The commercial was shot by Hugh Hudson and is

imbued with an ominous atmosphere and mounting tension which are only

released at the dramatic climax. Audiences had never seen anything like

it. Why is the helicopter there? The iguana? We never found out, which

of course was the point. The ad was part of a long-running campaign

produced by CDP for Benson & Hedges which demonstrated how advertising

restrictions could in fact fuel creative potency rather than restrict

it. Indeed the lack of a traditional idea in this commercial openly

mocked the ban on saying anything about cigarettes in advertising. An ad

that changed advertising.





3. CONSERVATIVE PARTY LABOUR ISN’T WORKING SAATCHI & SAATCHI.



Year: 1978

Title: Labour isn’t working

Client: Conservative Party

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Art director: Martyn Walsh

Writer: Andrew Rutherford



With this poster, Saatchi & Saatchi introduced aggressive advertising

techniques into party political campaigning and changed the rules of

elections forever. The ad is often cited as having been instrumental in

the fall of James Callaghan’s Labour administration and the coming to

power of Margaret Thatcher. It certainly worked against Labour as it

forced the incumbent Prime Minister to go on the defensive - in fact, if

Labour had not responded, the poster’s influence would have been greatly

diminished.



The stark depiction of a dole queue snaking out from an unemployment

office - which was not, contrary to rumours at the time, a line of

Saatchis’ staff queuing up in the office canteen - and the copyline,

with its clever double entendre, was aimed directly at traditional

Labour supporters who feared for their jobs. The poster perfectly

encapsulated the dissatisfaction with the Labour Government in the

run-up to the winter of discontent and it stuck to the chief rule of a

great poster: keep it simple.





4. TANGO ORANGE MAN HHCL.



Year: 1992

Title: Orange man

Client: Britvic

Agency: Howell Henry Chaldecott Lury

Art director: Trevor Robinson

Writer: Alan Young

Director: Matt Forrest

Production company: Limelight



Howell Henry’s apparently artless piece of slapstick has become a modern

classic. The commercial is perfectly cast, superbly timed and very, very

funny. In the style of a football replay, the ad shows someone being

’hit’ by the taste of Tango when a bald orange man runs up to him in the

high street and smacks him around the face. The deadpan voice of Ray

’Butch’ Wilkins is heard to say: ’The big orange fella runs on from the

left and gives him a good old slappin’.’ The pay-off line, ’You know

when you’ve been tangoed’, is enunciated in the gravelly tones of the

American singer-songwriter, Gil Scott Heron. ’Orange man’ was banned by

the Independent Television Commission following complaints by parents,

teachers and doctors who were concerned that children might perforate

each other’s eardrums while imitating the ad’s slapping action. Howell

Henry produced a new spot which showed the orange man kissing his victim

instead of hitting him. This ad set the tone for the 90s genre of

cheaper-looking, jerky hand-held camera commercials. Hugely

influential.





5. FIAT STRADA HANDBUILT BY ROBOTS COLLETT DICKENSON PEARCE.



Year: 1979

Title: Handbuilt by robots

Client: Fiat

Agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce

Art director: David Horry

Writer: Paul Weiland

Director: Hugh Hudson



Production company: Hudson Films Many people believe this is the best

commercial ever made. The three-minute extravaganza that launched the

Fiat Strada marked the first time an advertiser had occupied an entire

commercial break, and the ad still has impact 20 years after it was

first shown. CDP took a rather dull idea - a car being assembled by

robots - and endowed it with all the production values of a Hollywood

film. This was achieved through Hugh Hudson’s sweeping photography and a

rousing score: Rossini’s Figaro arranged by Vangelis.



The spot shows car body-shells being welded and riveted without a human

being in sight, and culminates in a spectacular stunt as the new models

drive at high speed into a delivery truck. The film ranks among the most

costly ads of all time - to make way for the film crew, the entire Fiat

factory in Turin had to be closed down. Shame about the car.





6. LEVI’S LAUNDERETTE, BATH, TOWING BARTLE BOGLE HEGARTY.



Year: 1985

Title: Launderette (also shown, Bath and Towing)

Client: Levi Strauss

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Art director: John Hegarty

Writer: Barbara Nokes

Director: Roger Lyons

Production company: Mike Dufficy & Partners



Bartle Bogle Hegarty’s ’launderette’ spot for Levi’s was a benchmark

commercial of the 80s and propelled jeans advertising to a previously

unheard-of level of popularity. Beautifully shot, the ad had humour, sex

appeal - in the form of the teenage idol, Nick Kamen - and a wonderful

soundtrack. The agency cleverly exploited young people’s aspirations for

the heritage of the 50s by associating Levi’s 501 jeans with a classic

period of youth culture. Marvin Gaye’s I Heard it Through the Grapevine

entered the charts and became inextricably linked to the brand. In fact,

Motown re-released the record with the 501 logo on the sleeve - an

example of integrated marketing almost before the term was invented. The

ad generated acres of press coverage and was instrumental in reviving a

sagging jeans market. A year after the 501s relaunch, sales were up 800

per cent. After this Levi’s ads - including gems such as ’bath’ and

’towing’ - became events eagerly anticipated by the public and press

alike.





7. HEC PREGNANT MAN SAATCHI & SAATCHI.



Year: 1969

Title: Pregnant man

Client: HEC/Family Planning Association

Agency: Cramer Saatchi

Art director: Bill Atherton

Writer: Jeremy Sinclair

Photographer: Alan Brooking



This poster is now regarded as a classic, although when it was first

shown there were many who thought it overstepped the boundaries of good

taste. As is often the case with great ads, it nearly didn’t happen at

all. The creative team at Cramer Saatchi was concerned about the

potential reaction to the image from the general public and hesitated

before presenting the idea to the creative chief, Charles Saatchi. He

loved it, however, and gave the team his approval to run the poster.

While the image may have been regarded as shocking, the ad nevertheless

found its way into the nation’s consciousness.





8. HEINEKEN POLICEMEN’S FEET, WATER IN MAJORCA, BLUES SINGER COLLETT

DICKENSON PEARCE



Year: 1974

Title: Policemen’s feet (also shown, Water in Majorca and Blues singer)

Client: Whitbread

Agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce (then Lowe Howard-Spink)

Art director: Vernon Howe

Writer: Terry Lovelock

Director: Vernon Howe

Production company: The Alan Parker Film Company



Testifying to its status as one of the all-time greats, Heineken’s

’refreshes the parts’ campaign spans three decades, has survived a

change of agency and is still going strong. The famous copyline, and its

’only Heineken can do this’ sign-off, was devised in 1974 by Collett

Dickenson Pearce and was first used in what must rank as one of the

funniest commercials ever - ’policemen’s feet’. The spot shows the

effects of drinking Heineken on the bared feet of six policemen. The

voice of Victor Borge explains how administering a dose of cold Heineken

refreshes the tired feet, ’causing lively movement of the toes and

activating the arches’. ’Heineken is the only beer able to do this,’ he

concludes, ’because it refreshes the parts other beers cannot reach.’

The formula was applied to a host of successful commercials, including

an 80s version of My Fair Lady in which a Sloane Ranger learns

street-credible elocution and Lowe Howard-Spink’s ’blues singer’, one of

the most awarded ads of the early 90s.





9. PARLIAMENTARY RECRUITING COMMITTEE LORD KITCHENER WANTS YOU CAXTON

ADVERTISING



Year: 1914

Title: Lord Kitchener wants you

Client: Parliamentary Recruiting Committee

Agency: Caxton Advertising

Artist: Alfred Leete

Writer: Eric Field



This depiction of Lord Kitchener commanding young men to sign up has

become one of the century’s great iconic images. The now famous line,

’Your country needs you’, was used as part of the same campaign to

encourage young men to enlist. The poster formed part of a concerted and

effective propaganda effort by the British Government during the First

World War that was subsequently criticised when the slaughter in the

trenches became the subject of recrimination. Even Adolf Hitler paid

tribute to Britain’s ’brilliant’ and ’ruthless’ war propaganda in Mein

Kampf. The evocative image in this poster spawned a thousand imitators.

Indeed, the concept was adapted in the US by James Montgomery Flagg

using the line: ’I want you for the US army.’





10. HAMLET PHOTO BOOTH, BUNKER, TENNIS COLLETT DICKENSON PEARCE.



Year: 1986

Title: Photo booth (also shown, Bunker and Tennis)

Client: Gallaher

Agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce

Director: Graham Rose

Writers: Philip Differ, Rowan Dean

Art director: Garry Horner

Production company: Rose Hackney Productions



After 36 years and more than 100 commercials, legislation that was to

have sounded the death-knell for this memorable campaign has just been

averted - or, more accurately, delayed - thanks to the High Court ruling

last month that the timing of the planned tobacco advertising ban in the

UK - due to begin on 10 December 1999, well before an European Union

deadline of July 2001 - was illegal. Hamlet ads won us over with their

consistently droll humour and became part of our collective

television-watching memory.



The copyline, famously, came to its creators on the top deck of a

bus.



The copywriter, Tim Warriner, and the art director, Roy Carruthers, left

work late on a rainy night after failing to crack a brief they had been

given weeks before. Once on board the bus, they lit up. ’Happiness is a

dry cigarette on a number 34 bus,’ Warriner sighed, and one of the most

famous campaigns in British advertising history was born. The line was

used to define the ’Hamlet moment’ - when despite the absurdity of

life’s misfortunes, someone could take solace in the pleasure of

lighting up a Hamlet. Jacques Loussier’s languorous arrangement of

Bach’s Air on a G-string set the moment off perfectly. Everyone has

their favourite Hamlet ad. Among the classics are ’Photo booth’, in

which the Scottish comedian, Gregor Fisher, struggles to get his

straggly haired head in the frame in a passport photo booth; ’tennis’,

where a man in a neck-brace tries to follow the ball at a tennis match;

and ’bunker’, the first commercial that Paul Weiland shot, in which a

hapless golfer digs himself deeper into his bunker. Arguably, the most

loved of all campaigns.





11. PG TIPS MR SHIFTER, BIKE RACE DAVIDSON PEARCE BERRY &

SPOTTISWOODE.



Year: 1970

Title: Mr Shifter (also shown, Bike race)

Client: Brooke Bond Oxo

Agency: Davidson Pearce Berry & Spottiswoode

Art director: David English

Writer: Tony Toller

Director: Berny Stringle

Production company: NS&H



PG Tips is one of the most popular and long-running campaigns of the

century, and its stars - the PG Tips chimps - are viewed with great

warmth and affection by the British public. The ads are beautifully

observed sketches on the British character - the inspiration for which

came to a copywriter chancing upon a chimpanzees’ tea-party at London

Zoo. ’Mr Shifter’, one of the most frequently televised commercials,

shows a bowler-hatted removal man/chimp and his son in a ginger wig

struggling to move a piano down a staircase. They are interrupted by the

tea-lady chimp serving light refreshments. Over the years, the chimps

have acquired the vocal talents of many top entertainers, including

Peter Sellers and Kenneth Williams. The campaign was launched in 1956

when PG Tips was ranked fourth by market share. Within two years, it had

toppled Typhoo from the number one slot.





12. CARLING BLACK LABEL DAMBUSTERS, SQUIRRELS, OLD SPICE SPOOF WCRS.



Year: 1989

Title: Dambusters (also shown, Squirrels, Old Spice spoof)

Client: Carling Black Label

Agency: WCRS

Art director: Jonathan Greenhalgh

Writer: Kes Grey

Director: Roger Woodburn

Production company: Park Village



One of the finest examples of cinema advertising, ’Dambusters’ is also

one of the funniest commercials of the past 30 years. The spot, which

won the director, Roger Woodburn, an elusive D&AD Black Pencil, is an

affectionate spoof of the 1954 film classic, The Dam Busters, and

includes the war epic’s rousing soundtrack.



Barnes Wallis’s bouncing bombs dropped by an RAF Lancaster bomber are

scuppered by some nifty goal-keeping from a Carling-drinking German

sentry. The co-pilot’s garbled utterances enhance the joke. Because the

spot was only for cinema and because, at that time, video to film

transfer quality was appalling, the director had to resurrect some old

film-based effects such as front projection and optical printers. A gem

from a highly successful campaign.





13. GUINNESS GIRDER SH BENSON.



Year: 1934

Title: Girder

Client: Arthur Guinness Sons & Company

Agency: SH Benson

Art director: John Gilroy

Artist: John Gilroy



This poster formed part of what is possibly the most famous British

advertising campaign of all time. Certainly the posters put out by

Guinness between 1929 and 1969 rank among the nation’s favourites. Their

success can largely be attributed to the talents of the artist, John

Gilroy, who was an art director at the SH Benson advertising agency. His

bold illustrative style and cheeky sense of humour carried the campaign

for 40 years. The image of the worker carrying the girder is the most

famous of the numerous clever executions in a campaign that suggested

drinking Guinness was beneficial to your health. The powerful graphical

composition in ’girder’ made full use of the billboard medium and would

no doubt have had a strong impact on the monochrome streets of Britain

in the 30s.





14. COURAGE BEST GERTCHA BMP.



Year: 1979

Title: Gertcha

Client: Courage

Agency: BMP

Art director: John Webster

Writer: Dave Trott

Director: Hugh Hudson

Production company: Hudson Films



The quirky boldness of ’Gertcha’ earns it a well-deserved place in

Campaign’s Hall of Fame. The famed cinematographer, Robert Krasker (El

Cid, The Third Man), was persuaded out of retirement to create the

special visual one-take style for this witty John Webster execution.

Having discovered Chas and Dave singing in a pub on the Isle of Dogs,

Webster decided their Gertcha song was rather mournful so he got them to

speed it up for a commercial that prompted a revival of black and white

photography in UK advertising. In 1992, Courage decided to put ’Gertcha’

back on air; it says something about the strength of the ad that the

only change was the end-frame.





15. HOVIS BICYCLE, LEAVING HOME COLLETT DICKENSON PEARCE.



Year: 1975

Title: Bicycle (also shown, Leaving home)

Client: Hovis

Agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce

Art director: Ronnie Turner

Writer: David Brown

Director: Ridley Scott

Production company: RSA Films



Ridley Scott shot the Hovis boy pushing his bicycle up a hill in Dorset

to the strains of Dvorak’s New World Symphony and changed the way

commercials were perceived. Until then, TV ads had tended to be made by

directors who didn’t particularly care about advertising.



High-key lighting and product shots were the order of the day. Scott’s

flawless production values, meticulous attention to detail, superb

lighting, framing and editing skills demonstrated that shooting

commercials could be a craft. The Hovis spot was nostalgic without being

schmaltzy and used the backlit, soft-focus photography that was to

become one of the director’s trademarks when his career took off in

Hollywood.





16. JOHN SMITH’S BITTER DOG TRICKS BMP.



Year: 1981

Title: Dog tricks

Client: Courage

Agency: BMP

Art director: John Webster

Writer: John Webster

Director: Ian McMillan

Production company: Park Village



The partnership between Courage and BMP produced some of the most famous

work in beer advertising, including this classic Arkwright campaign for

John Smith’s. Masterminded by John Webster, the ads struck a chord with

the public and ran for more than nine years. The star of the show was a

lovable stereotype: a dour, beer-loving Yorkshireman with a regular

supporting cast including his long-suffering wife and faithful dog,

Tonto.



In this spot, Tonto, who shared his master’s love of beer, moved centre

stage and joined the barflies, performing tricks to earn a share of

Arkwright’s pint. The director, Ian McMillan, shot the spot using a

simple split-screen technique, with the actors imagining the dog’s

actions in between them.



McMillan saw nearly 200 dogs in the casting sessions and picked the only

one that made him laugh just to look at it.





17. BRITISH AIRWAYS MANHATTAN SAATCHI & SAATCHI.



Year: 1983

Title: Manhattan

Client: British Airways

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Art director: Phil Mason

Writer: Rita Dempsey

Director: Richard Loncraine

Production company: James Garrett & Partners



This landmark commercial, in which the island of Manhattan is shown

coming in to land at Heathrow, marked a turning point for British

Airways.



It reflected its increasing corporate confidence and conviction in the

claims it was making in its advertising. The 90-second spot focused on

something the client could deliver, albeit portrayed in a fantastic

way.



Set to an eerie soundtrack, the commercial shows Manhattan hovering over

the London suburbs as its inhabitants gaze up in astonishment. We hear

the exchanges between an air traffic controller and the pilot: ’Roger,

Manhattan, continue your descent to flight-level eight zero.’ As the

’island’ comes in to land, the voiceover reveals the concept: ’Every

year we bring more people across the Atlantic than the entire population

of Manhattan.’ Made with the help of the people who created Star Wars,

the ad presaged the increasing influence of special effects and computer

wizardry in advertising.





18. THE GUARDIAN POINTS OF VIEW BMP.



Year: 1986

Title: Points of view

Client: The Guardian

Agency: BMP

Art director: John Webster

Writer: Frank Budgen

Director: Paul Weiland

Production company: The Paul Weiland Film Company



As far as Paul Weiland is concerned, ’points of view’ is the best ad he

has ever made. Designed to enhance The Guardian’s reputation as an

open-minded newspaper, this intelligent 30-second commercial is a

powerful demonstration of the dangers of bias. It opens on a young

skinhead chasing an elderly businessman.



The skinhead is intent, the audience would immediately assume, on

assaulting him. As the camera pulls back, the viewers realise that the

skinhead is trying to protect the businessman from a pallet of falling

bricks. The copy reads: ’Only when you get the whole picture can you

really understand what’s going on.’ The spot was realised in complete

silence and won many awards, proving you don’t always need language for

an ad to work. The commercial also made legal history when it was used

by the defence in a court case.





19. BENSON & HEDGES PYRAMIDS, BIRDCAGE, MOUSE HOLE COLLETT DICKENSON

PEARCE



Year: 1977

Title: Pyramids (also shown, Birdcage and Mouse hole)

Client: Gallaher

Agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce

Art director: Neil Godfrey

Copywriter: Tony Brignull

Photographer: Jimmy Wormser



In pioneering the use of surreal imagery, this famous Benson & Hedges

campaign marked a turning point in tobacco ads and inspired a new style

of British advertising - one in which art direction took precedence. The

ads were Collett Dickenson Pearce’s way of avoiding the regulations

restricting cigarette advertising. The agency’s task was made easier by

an open brief from the client. Forbidden to say anything about the

product, CDP chose to do away with copy altogether and turned to some of

the leading photographers of the day to create a series of intriguing

images. In discarding product shots and copy, the campaign was

acknowledging consumers’ increased level of advertising literacy in the

late 70s. The creative team took inspiration from surrealist artists

such as Rene Magritte, and the campaign worked equally well on posters

and in the glossy pages of the newly emerging colour supplements.





20. RSPCA PILE OF DOGS ABBOTT MEAD VICKERS BBDO.



Year: 1989

Title: Pile of dogs

Client: RSPCA

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO

Art director: Ron Brown

Copywriter: David Abbott



One of the most controversial campaigns the charity has ever mounted

involved this 1989 long-copy ad by Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO. It shows a

harrowing photograph of a heap of dead dogs - some of the 1,000 animals

needlessly put down every day in Britain, the society said. The shock

level was maintained in two subsequent campaigns - one showing a black

plastic sack with the caption, ’This doggie bag contains a dead doggie’,

and the other featuring piles of dog excrement from strays. The ads

invited the public to phone a freephone number for a response pack and

to put pressure on their MPs to make the then home secretary, Nicholas

Ridley, change his mind about introducing a national dog registration

scheme.





21. PHILIPS FIRIPS LEAGAS DELANEY.



Script



The shop bell goes, an East-End jack-the-lad type walks in and is faced

by a rather patronising shop assistant.



Morning squire.



Morning sir.



I’d like a videocaster please.



A video recorder. Any one in particular?



Well I’d like it to have some specifications.



Yes.



And functions. I must have some functions.



I see, did you have any model in mind?



Well, a friend mentioned the Hari-kiri, kibuki, kissuni, er

ka-watchamacallit, you know the Japanese one, the 2000, cos I’m very

technically minded, you see.



I can see that, sir.



So I want one with all the bits on it, all the Japanese bits, you know

the 2000.



What system?



Er, well, er, electrical I think because I’d like to be able to plug it

into the television you see. I’ve got a Japanese television.



Have you?



Yeah I thought you’d be impressed, yeah, the 2000, the Hokie Kokie

2000.



Well sir, there is this model.



Yeah, that looks smart, yeah.



8 hours per cassette, all the functions that the others have.



Good, yeah, good.



And I know this’ll be of interest: a lot of scientific research has gone

into making it easy to operate.



Good, mmm, good yeah.



Even by a complete idiot like you.



Yeah ... pardon?



It’s a Philips.



Doesn’t sound very Japanese.



Nah, a Firips. I mean a Firips, it’s a Firips.



Yeah, er, well it is a 2000 is it?



Oh in fact it’s the 2022, mmm.



Mmm, no, nah, nope, it hasn’t got enough nobs on it, no. What’s that one

over there?



That’s a washing machine.



Yeah, what sort, a Japanese?



V/O: The VR2022. A video you can understand.



Year: 1983

Title: Firips

Client: Philips

Agency: Leagas Delaney

Writers: Griff Rhys Jones, Mel Smith, Tim Delaney

Production company: TalkBack



One of the most highly lauded radio commercials and arguably the best ad

produced for Philips, ’Firips’ was part of an enduring campaign created

by the comic duo, Mel Smith and Griff Rhys Jones. Written in half an

hour and recorded at midnight, in-between mixing a Not the Nine O’Clock

News record, it helped Philips rid itself of its solid, dependable

image, caused brand awareness to jump 24 per cent and inspired many

imitations.





22. MAXELL ISRAELITES HOWELL HENRY CHALDECOTT LURY.



Year: 1989

Title: Israelites

Client: Hitachi/Maxell

Agency: Howell Henry Chaldecott Lury

Art director: Tim Ashton

Writer: Naresh Ramchandani

Directors: Molotov Brothers (Steve Lowe, Martin Brierley)

Production company: Hutchins Film Company



This popular ad won numerous awards. The idea came from the tendency of

pop lyrics to be unintelligible and comically misunderstood. Desmond

Dekker’s Israelites pounds out on the soundtrack while a reggae fan

holds up boards on which misheard lyrics are written. For ’the

Israelites’, read ’me ears are alight’; for ’so that every mouth can be

fed’, substitute ’every monk and beef-head’. The endline reads: ’At

least I think that’s what he said - but I need to hear it on a Maxell.’

The film made a refreshing change from tape ads obsessed with technical

features.





23. PLAYTEX HELLO BOYS TBWA HOLMES KNIGHT RITCHIE.



Year: 1994

Title: Hello boys

Client: Playtex

Agency: TBWA Holmes Knight Ritchie

Art director: Nigel Rose

Writer: Nigel Rose

Photographer: Ellen Von Unwerth



’Hello boys’ - described by Campaign as an ’attention-grabbing,

sales-lifting, brand-building blockbuster’ - was the poster that

prompted thousands of column inches. Although more than 20 posters ran

in the Wonderbra campaign, this is the one that captured the imagination

of both the public and the media. Everyone from the Financial Times to

The Sun discussed the merits - or otherwise - of the ’Hello boys’ ad and

the ’bra wars’ that it helped to fuel. Eva Herzigova’s cleavage,

photographed by Ellen Von Unwerth, put bosoms back on the fashion agenda

and pushed up Playtex’s sales by 41 per cent year on year.





24. VW CHANGES BMP.



Year: 1987

Title: Changes

Client: Volkswagen Golf

Agency: BMP

Art director: Graham Featherstone

Writer: Barry Greensted

Director: David Bailey

Production company: Paul Weiland Film Company



’Changes’ beautifully captured the materialistic zeitgeist of the 80s

while providing a perfectly judged story to support the endline: ’If

only everything in life were as reliable as a Volkswagen.’ An alluring

Paula Hamilton tosses aside house keys, ring, pearls and fur coat as she

storms out of the mews house of her lover in the early morning. Only

when she gets to the point of dropping the car keys down the drain does

she change her mind - Hamilton then drives off in a Golf. The pace is

set by Alan Price singing Changes, originally written for his friend,

Zoot Money, when his marriage broke up.





25. HEINZ BEANZ MEANZ HEINZ YOUNG & RUBICAM.



Year: 1967

Title: Beanz Meanz Heinz

Client: HJ Heinz

Agency: Young & Rubicam

Art director: Jean Bird

Writer: Maurice Drake

Advertising lore has it that this famous copyline was written - by

Maurice Drake at Young & Rubicam - over two pints of bitter in the local

pub.



The slogan certainly ranks among the most enduring and popular

advertising lines of the century. With its deliberate misspellings, it

also had the effect of setting the education fraternity on edge at the

time of its first appearance in 1967.





26. CASTLEMAINE XXXX SHERRY SAATCHI & SAATCHI.



Year: 1986

Title: Sherry

Client: Allied National Brands

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Art director: Alexandra Taylor

Writer: Mick Petherick

Director: John Marles

Production company: RSA Films



’Australians wouldn’t give a Castlemaine XXXX for anything else’: the

risque endline characterised the stereotypical Australian mentality that

informed the campaign and catapulted itself into the British

consciousness.



The hilarious storyline of this spot centred on a group of Aussie

shearers who bring along ’two bottles of sweet sherry for the ladies’ to

a party, only to comment that ’it looks like we’ve over-done it with the

sherry’.



The ’XXXX’ endline has recently been resurrected after 15 years - a

testament to its success in building the brand.





27. ARALDITE TEAPOT FOOTE CONE & BELDING.



Year: 1982

Title: Teapot

Client: Ciba Geigy

Agency: Foote Cone & Belding

Art director: Robert Kitchen

Writer: Ian Potter

The great unpublished rulebook of advertising carries the instruction,

’If you can demonstrate, demonstrate’. In what is arguably the most

audacious use of a billboard ever, ’teapot’ did just that - showing

quite clearly, and with great wit, that Araldite glue does what it says

on the packet.



The campaign set a precedent by using the poster as a three-dimensional

medium. The great and the good of the advertising world regularly vote

it as one of the ’best of the best’.





28. LEVI’S CREEK BARTLE BOGLE HEGARTY.



Year: 1993

Title: Creek

Client: Levi Strauss

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Art director: John Gorse

Writer: Nick Worthington

Directors: Vaughan & Anthea

Production company: Lewin & Watson



With ’creek’, Levi’s moved on from the ’boy meets girl’ formula and

sought inspiration from its roots in 1850s America. Shot in moody black

and white and set to an enigmatic score, the ad shows a strait-laced

family picnicking in the open country. The two daughters drift off to a

nearby creek and spot a pair of jeans on a rock and the hero bathing in

the water - naked, it is assumed. The music reaches a crescendo as he

emerges from the water to reveal that he is wearing jeans and shrinking

them to fit and the owner of the abandoned pair is a scruffy old man.

Beautifully shot and edited, the commercial is utterly compelling.





29. GLC WANT ME OUT BMP.



Year: 1984

Title: Want me out

Client: Greater London Council

Agency: BMP

Art director: Paul Leeves

Writer: Alan Tilby



The campaign to retain the GLC must rank as one of the most significant

in UK advertising history. While the advertising failed to prevent the

abolition of the GLC, the scale of what it did achieve was

impressive.



The ads stimulated public and media opposition to the Thatcher regime’s

proposals, transforming the issue from one of obscure local government

administration into a matter of genuine concern. They pushed the issue

up the political agenda and undermined confidence in the Government’s

reforms. Campaigns such as this also changed perceptions of advertising

and showed it could be a force for social change.





30. VW LAMP-POST BMP.



Year: 1998

Title: Lamp-post

Client: Volkswagen

Agency: BMP

Art director: Andrew Fraser

Writer: Andrew Fraser

Director: Paul Gay

Production company: Outsider



’Lamp-post’ marked the return of the idea in the late 90s. Simple but

devastatingly effective, the commercial showed workmen cladding a

lamp-post to cushion passers-by distracted by a poster advertising the

VW Polo’s low price. The spot won the overwhelming approval of both

consumers and the ad industry and increased VW’s market share. Given the

price-led brief - to persuade consumers that VWs do not cost as much as

they might think - BMP came up trumps with a creative concept pared down

to its bare essentials.





31. SONY ARMCHAIR BMP.



Year: 1995

Title: Armchair

Client: Sony

Agency: BMP

Art director: Jerry Hollens

Writer: Mike Boles

Director: Daniel Barber

Production company: Rose Hackney Barber



In this spectacular commercial a besuited man in an armchair freefalls

through the air and just as he is about to crash into the hangar on the

ground he changes channels on his TV to stop his hyper-real

experience.



The spot ends as he plummets into his living room, closely followed by

his pet cat who has also been caught up in the effect. A top Hollywood

crew were on location in California’s Simi Valley and a skydiving

cameraman fell through the air to capture the ambitious images in

director Daniel Barber’s stunning storyboard.





32. HOLSTEN PILS GEORGE RAFT GOLD GREENLEES TROTT.



Year: 1983

Title: George Raft

Client: Holsten Distributors

Agency: Gold Greenlees Trott

Art director: Axel Chaldecott

Writer: Steve Henry

Director: Richard Sloggett

Production company: Brooks Fulford Coutts Seresin



Nobody could fail to be impressed with the way this campaign seamlessly

meshed Griff Rhys Jones with old Hollywood movie scenes. The sharply

written scripts - in which original lines were spliced in with new ones

spoken by Rhys Jones - added the finishing touch to a witty and

memorable advertising series. The George Raft spot shows the protagonist

being visited in prison by a perky Rhys Jones clutching an enticing

glass of Holsten Pils. The comedian also had close encounters with

Marilyn Monroe, John Wayne, Humphrey Bogart, James Cagney and Edward G.

Robinson.





33. VW WEDDING BMP.



Year: 1999

Title: Wedding

Client: Volkswagen

Agency: BMP

Art director: Neil Dawson

Writer: Clive Pickering



Part of Volkswagen’s ’affordability’ campaign, ’wedding’ demonstrated

once again BMP’s ability to come up trumps when faced with the potential

nightmare of a price-led brief. The ad shows a blurred shot of a wedding

couple with a bus-side poster for the Polo model in sharp focus in the

background.



The strapline reads: ’Surprisingly ordinary prices.’ Originally a press

campaign, it was made into a poster to capitalise on the extensive TV

coverage of Prince Edward’s wedding in June 1999.





34. GUINNESS SURFERS ABBOTT MEAD VICKERS BBDO.



Year: 1999

Title: Surfers

Client: Guinness

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO

Art director: Walter Campbell

Writer: Tom Carty

Production company: Academy

Director: Jonathan Glazer



’Surfers’, one of the most expensive ads in Guinness’s history, took the

industry by storm. Jaw-droppingly impressive in its use of

state-of-the-art technology, the images of crashing waves that turn into

stampeding horses are stunning. Nine days were spent shooting surfers in

Hawaii, three days filming horses in a studio, and the spot boasts the

same digital technology that was used for Titanic. The ad continued the

theme of ’all good things come to those who wait’ - as surfers wait for

the ultimate wave, so drinkers wait for a pint of Guinness to settle -

and was chosen to feature in the Millennium Dome. A thrilling ride.





35. SMIRNOFF THE 8.29 YOUNG & RUBICAM.



Year: 1970

Title: The 8.29

Client: International Distillers & Vintners

Agency: Young & Rubicam

Art director: David Tree

Writer: John Bacon



Permissible exaggeration - ’It was the 8.29 every morning until I

discovered Smirnoff’ - is as old as the hills in advertising. We know

the product will not transform our life, but we are pleased to be

included in the joke. It is testimony to a great creative concept that

Smirnoff still uses the idea that its brand has the power to transform

in its advertising today. This witty campaign included several memorable

executions, including one with the copyline: ’Advertising was my life

until I discovered Smirnoff.’





36. BBC PERFECT DAY LEAGAS DELANEY.



Year: 1997

Title: Perfect day

Client: BBC

Agency: Leagas Delaney

Art director: Ian Ducker

Writer: Will Farquhar

Director: Gregory Rood

Production company: The Paul Weiland Film Company



This stunning piece of corporate communications was truly a big-time

commercial. With a running time of four minutes, it featured 29

musicians - including Lou Reed, David Bowie, Tom Jones, Elton John, Bono

and Lesley Garrett - and took a year to make. The brief was to show the

range of music on offer to BBC viewers and listeners, and it could never

have been made without the goodwill of the recording stars who earned

just pounds 250 apiece for their efforts. Inevitably attacked for its

cost and scheduling, the BBC response was that it was just good

marketing.





37. BMW SHAKEN NOT STIRRED WCRS.



Year: 1984

Title: Shaken not stirred

Client: BMW

Agency: WCRS

Art director: Cathy Heng

Writer: Robin Wight



’Shaken not stirred’ was born from a technique that BMW’s ad agency,

WCRS, called ’product interrogation’. The agency made an annual

pilgrimage to Munich to ’interrogate the product until it confessed to

its strengths’.



The trip that yielded ’shaken’ has become part of agency folklore.

WCRS’s Robin Wight spent half a day pounding away at a BMW engineer to

understand why six cylinders were smoother than four. Eventually the

engineer explained how a glass of water on the engine of a Mercedes

would be destabilised by the imperfections in the balance of the engine.

But with the BMW, the engineer said, neither the glass nor the water

would move.





38. BODDINGTONS ICE-CREAM BARTLE BOGLE HEGARTY



Year: 1993

Title: Ice-cream

Client: Whitbread/Boddingtons

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Art director: Mike Wells

Writer: Tim Hudson



The decision to be highly selective with the media placement for this

campaign (focusing particularly on the back covers of magazines) helped

to ensure high visibility among the target audience. The visuals and

copy worked well together, while the endline, ’Boddingtons, the cream of

Manchester’, complemented the almost three-dimensional photographs. Part

of the campaign’s success can also be attributed to the fact that it did

not pander to ubiquitous ’yoof marketing’ tactics.





39. NIKE ’66 WAS A GREAT YEAR SIMONS PALMER DENTON CLEMMOW AND

JOHNSON.



Year: 1994

Title: ’66 was a great year

Client: Nike

Agency: Simons Palmer Denton Clemmow and Johnson

Art director: Andy McKay

Writer: Giles Montgomery



Nike, famous for its rebellious appeal to ’just do it’, is one of the

century’s advertising phenomenons. Working in partnership with blue-chip

agencies such as Chiat/Day, Wieden & Kennedy and Simons Palmer, it

produced a catalogue of outstanding campaigns. It also took godlike

celebrity endorsement to a new level as this cheeky poster, launched at

the height of Eric Cantona’s fame, ably demonstrates.





40. NATIONAL MILK PUBLICITY COUNCIL DRINKA PINTA MILKA DAY MATHER &

CROWTHER.



Year: 1958

Title: Drinka pinta milka day

Client: National Milk Publicity Council

Agency: Mather & Crowther

Writer: Bertrand Whitehead



Advertising lore has it that it was in fact the client - the executive

officer of the National Milk Publicity Council, Bertrand Whitehead - who

came up with this famous copyline to promote milk. Mather & Crowther’s

creative department did not take to the idea - possibly because it

wasn’t theirs - but their boss, the late great David Ogilvy, overruled

them and the ad ran to wide acclaim. The poster’s strong design, and in

particular its beautiful typography, gave the slogan added impact.





41. THE ECONOMIST MANAGEMENT TRAINEE ABBOTT MEAD VICKERS.



Year: 1989

Title: Management trainee

Client: The Economist

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers

Art director: Ron Brown

Writer: David Abbott



The Economist has been one of the most consistently inventive poster

advertisers and ’management trainee’ is the cleverest execution in an

inspirational campaign that not only has its own look, but its own tone

of voice. The simplicity of the poster belies its strong branding, which

partly comes from borrowing the magazine’s red masthead. The copywriting

skills of David Abbott are also clearly apparent. This campaign, with

its clever message of ’read this and be successful’, has succeeded in

developing an enduring relationship with consumers for more than a

decade.





42. VW MR FELDMAN DOYLE DANE BERNBACH (LONDON).



Year: 1969

Title: Mr Feldman

Client: Volkswagen

Agency: Doyle Dane Bernbach (London)

Art director: Brian Byfield

Writer: David Abbott



Only Volkswagen could inspire a campaign that focused on the ugliness of

the car. In this low-key but highly amusing press ad, the skill is all

in the self-deprecating copy. The VW is compared to the comedian and

actor, Marty Feldman: ’No-one would ever mistake you for Gregory

Peck.



Yet you’ve made it right to the top. On talent. And that’s kind of

reassuring when you make a car that looks like ours.’ Unexpected,

attention-grabbing and uncompromising in its honesty.





43. HAAGEN-DAZS WORD OF MOUTH BARTLE BOGLE HEGARTY.



Year: 1991

Title: Word of mouth

Client: Haagen-Dazs

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Art director: Rooney Carruthers

Writer: Larry Barker



This raunchy campaign, which unashamedly positioned ice-cream as a

sensual, adult food, may have raised a few eyebrows but it put

Haagen-Dazs firmly on the map and persuaded people that it was worth

spending up to six times more than they would normally pay for

ice-cream. The ads featured black-and-white photographs of semi-clad

couples in amorous clinches with the obligatory ice-cream tub very much

part of the action. The juxtaposition of explicit sexual imagery with

the self-consciously serious text describing the product was a fine

combination.





44. HEALTH EDUCATION COUNCIL FEET SAATCHI & SAATCHI.



Year: 1979

Title: Feet

Client: Health Education Council

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Garland-Compton

Art director: Ron Mather

Writer: Andrew Rutherford



This execution continued the tradition of excellent family planning ads

of the era, which included the popular ’pregnant man’ ad. Readers will

appreciate the irony that The Sun and The Daily Mirror refused to run

the ad, deeming it inappropriate for family newspapers, despite its

educational tone. The execution still has relevance today - the hallmark

of a great piece of advertising.





45. THE INDEPENDENT IT IS. ARE YOU? SAATCHI & SAATCHI.



Year: 1986

Title: It is. Are you?

Client: The Independent

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Art director: Digby Atkinson

Writers: Peter Russell, Tim Mellors



With this campaign, The Independent cleverly decided to concentrate on

what it claimed was its unique selling proposition, namely, that at its

launch, it was the only independently owned and, therefore

independent-thinking, English broadsheet newspaper. The campaign

astutely played on the public’s fear of the increasing influence of

media barons, and its copyline quickly entered the vernacular.





46. MINISTRY OF INFORMATION CARELESS TALK.



Year: 1940

Title: Careless talk

Client: Ministry of Information

Artist: Cyril Kenneth Bird Fougasse



The cartoonist, Fougasse, who worked at Punch when he created this

famous campaign for the Ministry of Information, lent a refreshing and

much-needed sense of humour to the Second World War propaganda

machine.



The ads caught the popular imagination and, by all accounts, were

effective in fulfilling their brief. The campaign even prompted the then

Princess Elizabeth to remark: ’How carelessly we should have talked

during the war but for Fougasse.’





47. BRITISH EGG MARKETING BOARD GO TO WORK ON AN EGG MATHER &

CROWTHER.



Year: 1957

Title: Go to work on an egg

Client: British Egg Marketing Board

Agency: Mather & Crowther

Art director: Ruth Gill

Writers: Fay Weldon, Mary Gowing



As an advertising copywriter at Mather & Crowther in 1957, Fay Weldon

helped to create this, one of the all-time classic advertising

slogans.



The campaign included a TV spot starring Tony Hancock and featured ’egg

chicks’ - women dressed as chickens but with high heels and short skirts

- who rooted through people’s bins for egg shells. If discovered, the

household received six free eggs. Interestingly, the public did not take

to its eggs being stamped with a lion hallmark and the idea was

abandoned.



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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).