CAMPAIGN INTERNATIONAL: WHAT’S HOT IN ARGENTINA

In Argentina we are coming out of a period of decline in terms of creativity in advertising - it seems as though it has taken a long time to reverse the trend but perhaps it isn’t really as long as it seems.

In Argentina we are coming out of a period of decline in terms of

creativity in advertising - it seems as though it has taken a long time

to reverse the trend but perhaps it isn’t really as long as it

seems.



Emotional, pretentious commercials that are long to the point of

exaggeration and full of slow-motion imagery have cluttered the airwaves

for what has seemed like an eternity.



There have been ads featuring monotonous voices delivering tedious

speeches following one after another during each boring commercial break

on every broadcast channel.



But after a fallow period it looks like there’s an excellent year ahead

for Argentinian advertising. The ’calling llama’ by Agulla & Baccetti

for Telecom is a series of commercials where we see a group of llamas

devoted to making jokes by phone.



The jokes are very local and extremely difficult to explain, but without

a doubt this was one of the campaigns responsible for refreshing the

tired Argentinian ad break.



Grey and its TV ad for Stafford Miller’s denture fixative, Corega, is a

second campaign that demonstrates a renaissance in Argentinian

advertising.



This is another campaign that uses humour and, despite its low budget,

is utterly effective, short and very simple in terms of the message it

is conveying.



The ad shows a grandfather and his grandson sitting watching television

on which we can hear some kind of spaghetti western. The child has a

fizzy drink but no bottle opener, so he capitalises on the strength of

his grandfather’s denture fixative by using the old man’s teeth to open

the bottle.



It turns around the macho image of such an action while cleverly

emphasising the brand’s qualities.



Souto TCC’s TV campaign for the language school the Liceo Cultural

Britanico has managed to sustain the same level of creativity as the

superb radio campaign that ran before and is the third example of how

our ability to make good advertising is returning.



In this campaign we see a man in a kitchen cutting up onions. A man

appears at the kitchen window and starts yelling at him in English,

asking why he isn’t making the sandwich he asked for.



Oblivious to the commotion, the man in the kitchen continues chopping

the onions. The disgruntled man reappears at the window and continues

yelling in English, asking where his sandwich is. This prompts the other

man to read a translation of the angry torrent of words. He understands,

returns to the kitchen, abandons the onions and begins to make the

sandwich. It’s a simple idea, but very effective.



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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).