CAMPAIGNDIRECT: REVIEW

According to the first piece, the Land Rover Defender is both a Collie and a Friesan. Just the nightmare creature you’d expect down on the genetically modified farm. The copy also refers to Herdwicks, whatever they may be, as well as pregnant sheep. Clearly, it’s not targeted at the core 4x4 audience of school-run mums and King’s Road cruisers.

According to the first piece, the Land Rover Defender is both a

Collie and a Friesan. Just the nightmare creature you’d expect down on

the genetically modified farm. The copy also refers to Herdwicks,

whatever they may be, as well as pregnant sheep. Clearly, it’s not

targeted at the core 4x4 audience of school-run mums and King’s Road

cruisers.



No, this is about the real thing: a proper Land Rover. A vehicle for

people who know what slurry is and don’t mind a bit of it on the

paintwork.



Hence, the mailing is not so much art directed as constructed out of

granite.



The only word for it is craggy.



Last year, when Land Rover scooped yet another armful of awards, some of

the audience at the ceremony booed. Shame on you. If you don’t like it,

improve on it. And if your clients won’t cough up decent budgets, get

hold of some of the excellent Land Rover work (of which this is a minor

example) and beat them over the head with it.



One of The Economist mailings targets accountants, the other lawyers.

You can tell from the ponderous puns - ’judge’, ’trial’, ’verdict’,

’money matters’, ’financial sense’ and so on.



These are competent mailings, but they reflect neither the lucidity of

The Economist, nor the wit of the advertising. And so the brand is

diminished. Direct marketing can be an over-earnest business, and

sometimes the creative succumbs too and loses all playfulness and wit.

Lighten up everybody - not everything we sell is a cure for cancer.



Alliance & Leicester knows this. It says: ’Life’s for living, not

banking.’ I welcome such rare humility from a bank. Usually, banks score

high on our patent Bollocks-ometer(R), knowing the price of everything

but the value of nothing. However, this one appears to be different.



OK, the lines aren’t always totally consistent, the colour choices can

be a little noisy and the offer isn’t unique. But, frankly, I was

charmed by this work, and how often can you say that about a bank?



Finally, we have Club Med. It has used one of my favourite media - the

postcard - which has enforced brevity and, hence, productive

discipline.



These seem to have a concept uniting them, and indeed all three fit

together like an idiot’s jigsaw to make one image. Each is aimed at a

different family member, and so different key words appear on each, such

as ’relationship’, ’eating’ and ’wine’ (you figure out which is for

whom).



So, all of the right buttons get pushed, even though I’m still not sure

what Club Med is. I’ll have to call for the brochure - there you go, it

works, this direct stuff.



Paul Kitcatt is the managing director and the former creative director

of Brann London



CREDITS

LAND ROVER DEFENDER

Brief: Sell the utilitarian Defender to farmers in one of the

agriculture industry’s worst-ever years

Agency: Craik Jones

Copywriter: Simon Kershaw

Art director: Philip Keevill

THE ECONOMIST

Brief: Attract new subscribers using two different special offers

Agency: Evans Hunt Scott

Copywriters: Amanda Goldman, Helen Harris

Art directors: Phil Bucknell,

Phil Watson

ALLIANCE & LEICESTER

Brief: Develop a strong, modern advertising campaign to strike a chord

with the core audience

Agency: Barraclough Hall Woolston Gray

Copywriter: Caitlin Ryan

Art director: Charlie Smith

CLUB MED

Brief: Stimulate brochure requests and direct sales

Agency: Publicis Dialog

Copywriter: Suzanne Winterflood

Art director: Caroline Jaggard