CLIENT OF THE WEEK: Maker of a children’s crusade - Marian Rose hopes to put the NSPCC out of business, Francesca Newland writes

Marian Rose is sitting on a knife’s edge. As head of marketing for the NSPCC, she is overseeing the launch of what she believes is the biggest campaign in UK charity history - it’s certainly one of the most ambitious.

Marian Rose is sitting on a knife’s edge. As head of marketing for

the NSPCC, she is overseeing the launch of what she believes is the

biggest campaign in UK charity history - it’s certainly one of the most

ambitious.



On Tuesday, the charity unveiled a programme called Full Stop. Its aim:

to end all cruelty to children within a generation. ’We want to bring a

definitive end to the problem of child abuse. It’ll mean putting

ourselves out of business,’ she says.



This objective is backed by a campaign created by Saatchi & Saatchi,

which has worked with the NSPCC for more than ten years. It replaces

’excuses’, an outdoor campaign that featured physically abused children

and typical excuses to hide abuse such as ’he tripped down the stairs’,

which was launched two years ago.



Full Stop has a pounds 3 million spend and targets all adults using TV

and posters. Rose says: ’Awareness campaigns are quite unusual in the

voluntary sector. Usually we focus on appeal advertising. The scale is

new, but we think the objectives are realistic. We have been working on

it for two years.



’We believe that as a society we should be changing the way we think of

children. The campaign relies on changing attitudes and we can’t do that

without mass communication.’



The campaign targets adults who come into contact with children. It aims

to prick the consciences of abusers and also to encourage people to look

out for abuse among the children they know.



While hinting at disturbing incidents of child abuse, the ad emphasises

how easy it is to look away, using children’s icons such as Action Man,

Alan Shearer and the Spice Girls, all covering their eyes.



Rose says: ’People find it (child abuse) very painful so they look away

and that makes them feel guilty. They get into a negative cycle.’ The

second phase of the advertising will advise people what to do to break

out of the cycle.



’We want people to be aware of their usual reaction, and to feel that

they can do something to help. People feel disempowered so we are saying

’you must get personally involved and together we can end this’,’ Rose

explains.



Rose is a devotee of the voluntary sector. She joined the NSPCC in

August 1996 from the Royal National Institute for Deaf People, where she

was head of marketing.



Working for a good cause is incentive enough for Rose: ’My goal is to

work for social change. I want to use my marketing expertise to improve

things. The joy of working for a cause like this is that it makes a

difference to people’s lives.’



The kind of drive it takes to launch a campaign with an objective as

ambitious as that of Full Stop should mean that Rose won’t have too much

trouble finding another job if she succeeds in putting herself out of

one at the NSPCC.



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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).