CLOSE-UP: CLIENT OF THE WEEK; Baxter relishes Fujitsu launch

Barrie Baxter promises to make the PC market more appealing.

Barrie Baxter promises to make the PC market more appealing.



At weekends, Barrie Baxter likes to get out his Italian motorbike and

charge around race tracks at 180 miles per hour. During the week he

keeps to the speed limit on his way to work at Fujitsu, where he is the

vice-president, marketing.



‘I like to have fun and I want to try everything’, Baxter says,

describing both his personality and professional ethos.



Baxter started his working life rather unusually - making replicas of

highland cattle and sheep to sell to tourists. He moved to Marks and

Spencer as a management trainee, before making the leap to IBM.



Baxter also had a novel holiday job while he was studying for a degree

in accounting and finance at Liverpool Polytechnic. He would take a

flight to Canada, where he was born, and top up his grant by working as

a professional footballer.



He lived in Canada until he was eight, when his family moved to a farm

in Scotland. Following spells in London, France and Germany, he now

lives in Henley with his three young children.



Baxter’s spirit kept him roaming around Marks and Spencer, and then IBM,

seeking out interesting and challenging posts.



‘I have a low boredom threshold,’ he confesses. But Baxter, 36, is not

likely to be bored at Fujitsu, where he has taken on the major task of

launching the brand into the European PC market, with the help of

advertising from newly appointed TBWA (Campaign, last week). Baxter’s

main aim is to give the Japanese company a human face.



Information Technology’s pace of change, rather than the products

themselves, attracted him to the sector. ‘I enjoy marketing - the

challenge of finding an audience, communicating with it, and providing a

good experience,’ he comments.



The launch of Fujitsu, scheduled for September, is all-consuming at the

moment, and Baxter has no worries about the future.



He says with typical optimism: ‘I don’t plan - the right thing always

happens.’