CLOSE-UP: CLIENT OF THE WEEK - Dr Pepper builds on success - Peter Coombe is returning to a trusted ad campaign, Francesca Newland writes

It is an important week for Peter Coombe, the Cadbury Schweppes marketing controller responsible for Dr Pepper. He is turning 30 and launching a pounds 7.5 million campaign to support his favourite soft drink.

It is an important week for Peter Coombe, the Cadbury Schweppes

marketing controller responsible for Dr Pepper. He is turning 30 and

launching a pounds 7.5 million campaign to support his favourite soft

drink.



Coombe, a New Zealander by birth, says he loves working on Dr Pepper -

he claims his fridge is full of it. But, more importantly, it’s a

growing brand. ’I’m keen to work on Dr Pepper because it is going so

well. It’s a monster. It’s neat working with the youth market,’ he

says.



The brand was launched in the UK four years ago with the help of some

heavy advertising support, and it enjoyed a 127 per cent increase in

sales last year.



The campaign, which breaks on Friday, brings back the ’dare to try it’

theme - developed by Young & Rubicam in London with its ’porch’

execution.



However, the new campaign was created by Y&R in New York, which won the

brief after a pitch against Y&R’s London and Melbourne offices.



The campaign is running in all major markets except the US, where it is

an established brand - it was invented in 1885 in Waco, Texas.



The new ad was shot in a prison off the coast of Marseilles and features

a prisoner going to great lengths to avoid having to try Dr Pepper,

because he is terrified of the taste. He is eventually forced to try it,

loves it so much that he drinks enough to make a raft out of empty cans,

and uses the vessel as a means of escape from prison. At the end of the

year, the company will launch a second execution, called ’visiting

room’.



The campaign replaces ’special delivery’, which told consumers that Dr

Pepper is not a cola. Coombe says: ’Dr Pepper advertising was remembered

by 37 per cent of its audience last year, higher than any other

carbonated soft drink despite a significantly lower spend. This shows

incredible advertising effectiveness.’



Dr Pepper has fared best among young teens. Coombe explains: ’It’s about

equal to Sprite in the UK and it’s chasing hard on the heels of Tango

and Fanta. Teens like it the most because of the taste. When you are

nine to 15-years-old, you haven’t yet formed your taste perception; you

have a more open mind.’



Media planning for the task, through MediaEdge, targets teens and adults

up to the age of 34.



’We’re not struggling for differentiation, everyone knows it tastes

different. That’s what makes it a power brand in the UK,’ he adds.



Coombe was a ’marketing man with Guinness in New Zealand’ until two

years ago when he moved to Britain. He has been with Cadbury Schweppes

for 18 months.



For those still unaware of what Dr Pepper tastes like, it’s a

fruit-based drink made from 23 fruit-flavoured essences.



But as Coombe concedes: ’It’s hard to put any taste profile on it.’



Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).