The Co-operative Food encourages kindness to strangers in Christmas ad

The Co-operative Food is encouraging people to surprise others with a random act of kindness in its festive campaign.

The ad, by Leo Burnett, sees a young man popping out to pick up some ice cubes, sliding across the icy streets.

On his way to his local Co-op he notices an elderly man attempting to leave his home but goes back indoors when he realises the slippery conditions.

As the young man picks up some ice, he also adds other items such as cheese, a box of chocolates and some smoked salmon. On his way back he leaves a bag full of items in front of the old man’s house.

There are also three ten-second ads which see the old man and his wife enjoying the festive grub.

The films were created by Darren Keff and Phillip Meyler, and directed by Tom Tagholm through Park Pictures. Rocket handled the media planning and buying.

Amanda Jennings, the marketing director at The Co-operative Food, said: "Unlike our competitors, we believe our ad shows the real magic behind Christmas, and that for many people, it’s not glitz and glamour that matters, but kindness.

"We’re here to bring a little extra to the party and demonstrate we can add some Christmas merriment to the everyday shop. The advert encapsulates who we are as a retailer within communities, and shows some of the human truths that our stores see every day.

"We want to inspire shoppers this year, and encourage customers to discover more in our stores than they bargained for when they pop in to shop with us."

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