CRAFT: PORTFOLIO: Steve Lowe

Steve Lowe started making his mark on the commercials scene during the mid-80s as part of the directing collective, the Molotov Brothers. Their stock-in-trade was a brash mixture of live action, animation, special effects and wacky humour.

Steve Lowe started making his mark on the commercials scene during

the mid-80s as part of the directing collective, the Molotov Brothers.

Their stock-in-trade was a brash mixture of live action, animation,

special effects and wacky humour.



But his finest moment from those days has to be the side-splitting pair

of Maxell ads for Howell Henry Chaldecott Lury, written, incidentally,

by a young team who later went on to become high-profile creative

directors, Tim Ashton (now of Bates Dorland) and Naresh Ramchandani (of

St Luke’s).



The ads - one (allegedly) featuring a character Lowe spotted on a street

corner, the other a man who came to lay some carpet for him - are still

a delight and understandably have pride of place on his 1997 showreel

alongside more recent spots for Virgin Cola, the Daily Telegraph, Tango

and Pot Noodle.



After a peripatetic career on both sides of the Atlantic, including

stints at Propaganda Films, McMillan Phillips Hughes and Lowe, and RSA,

Lowe recently signed up with Cowboy Films, where he is working with the

producer, Dominic Freeman.



’What I like about Cowboy is that it is prepared to be diverse,’ Lowe

says, breaking into his trademark manic laugh for apparently no reason

whatsoever. ’I’ve started doing pop promos again, and I’m rewriting a

script for some gothic sci-fi feature film. I just love doing loads of

completely different things.’



This may also explain why he started Alfagetty 18 months ago. The

post-production outfit works entirely on souped-up Apple Macintosh

computers.



’They’re amazing machines,’ says Lowe, who has always had an obsessive

interest in special effects.



With this plenitude of interests and influences, does he feel he has a

recognisable style? ’It’s all very in-yer-face,’ Lowe admits. ’Someone

once asked me whether I’d ever heard of the word ’subtle’ and I had to

confess that I hadn’t.’ And with that, he launches into one of his crazy

laughs again.



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