CRAFT SECRETS: Why Quality Street turned sweets into a glamorous dress - Giant chocolate ’sequins’ were hand-sewn to make an outfit, Jade Garrett says

Glitter, over-indulgence and the sounds of Nat King Cole equals Christmas for many people. These things inspired the latest Quality Street ad from Ammirati Puris Lintas. The ad takes viewers on a magical journey along a mythical Quality Street spying into homes where the occupants are obsessed by the chocolates.

Glitter, over-indulgence and the sounds of Nat King Cole equals

Christmas for many people. These things inspired the latest Quality

Street ad from Ammirati Puris Lintas. The ad takes viewers on a magical

journey along a mythical Quality Street spying into homes where the

occupants are obsessed by the chocolates.



’We wanted the Quality Street ad to be impossibly glamorous,’ Harvey

Bertram-Brown, joint founder of the design company, New Renaiscance,

says.



The ad opens on a view through a window which reveals a woman whose

favourite sweet is the gold toffee penny. She’s wearing an evening dress

made of the sweets. New Renaiscance staff spent two weeks hand-stitching

2,000 gold pennies together. They wanted to make the sweets look like

giant over-sized sequins while the wrappers were used for trimming. The

sweets were stitched in long strands so they moved freely as the woman

walks around the room.



The finished dress was incredibly heavy and, as it hangs from thin

shoulder straps, a reinforced corset was sewn into the lining for extra

support.



Everything else in the scene had to reflect the glamour and colour of

the dress. The woman’s hair is sprayed gold and her nails, lips and eye

lashes are painted with gold glitter. She owns goldfish, is dusting a

gold gilt frame that hangs on a gold wall and pushes a gold hover across

a golden carpet. The roundness of the sweet is also reflected by a

bubble TV, her huge earphones and her golden afro.



In another setting, a fan of noisette chocolates decks out his living

room, and himself, in pale green triangles. Bertram-Brown says this was

an easier scene to design because it followed a more lateral

approach.



It opens on two women sat on either side of the man, representing a love

triangle. The women are dressed in the pale green colour and they all

sit on a green triangular sofa. A triangle shelving unit dominates the

room along with triangular curtains. The aim was to create the look of a

loft but other materials were also used. ’Green isn’t flattering,’ says

Bertram-Brown, ’so we used glass and plastics to combat this.’



The ad features two more homes where the occupants are as obsessive

about their favourite sweet.



New Renaiscance had eight weeks between receiving the script and

shooting to generate ideas for the rooms. Bertram-Brown says he wasn’t

sure if the client really understood what they were getting until they

saw the final cuts.