Digital Trends: Consumers create marketing opportunities online as they look to unleash their own creativity

Consumers are looking to unleash their creativity online as a Microsoft study has found that a third (33 per cent) of UK respondents said they'd be interested in making their own digital products and services*.

Consumers want help to create new experiences and understand how products work, and are keen to experiment with technology for their own needs, according to Microsoft.

The study reports: "Greater numbers of consumers are developing the skills to re-create technology, building online services and learning to code in their spare time. For example, skills are being developed from a young age within after-school clubs such as Code Club, and CoderDojo (an open source, volunteer-led free coding club for young people which is now available in 27 countries)."

New technology, such as 3D printing, enables consumers to disrupt previous business models and equip them with the skills to create products at home, which they may have previously bought.

Brands, as a consequence, have a valuable opportunity to collaborate with customers to create new and innovative products and services. To stay ahead of the curve, brands can differentiate themselves by working with consumers to offer guidance, creativity and expertise, the report recommends.

This trend – Creator Culture – is one of eight key digital trends that Microsoft has identified as it maps changing and emerging consumer behaviour and attitudes globally toward brands and advertising. Brand Republic has published the insights behind these eight trends.



* From around 1,000 respondents

Microsoft Advertising has joined forces with Brand Republic at microsoft.brandrepublic.com to share the findings of its research insights into the future of digital behaviour and technology with brands and agencies. The first study is called Digital Trends and was conducted with IPG Mediabrands and The Future Laboratory. Visit to find out more on emerging digital consumer trends among early adopters as well as regular and heavy Internet users. The study examined awareness and engagement with trends, and evaluated behaviour and attitudes toward technology.

Follow the debate about these findings on Twitter at @MSAdvertisingUK and use the hashtag #MSFTinsight to join in.

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