Dove's real beauty beat gets men's hearts thumping

Social video experts at Be On review "The real beauty beats", the latest video from Dove to go viral.

The brand’s latest spot has sparked criticism from those who feel the campaign suggests a woman is only beautiful if a male holds this opinion of her.


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Known for tugging at its audience's’ heartstrings, Dove have taken a more literal approach for its latest campaign.

A social experiment involving men being hooked up to heart monitors, the video aims to highlight women’s real beauty.

It doesn’t though come in the form of Photoshop. When shown images of conventionally attractive women you’d expect to see on the cover of a magazine, the men participating in the video evoke a cold and objective response.

However, when they see images of the females in their own lives, they are unable to conceal their emotions of happiness, which are visualised through their quick heart rates on the monitor.

Whether it’s a wife’s open smile or a mother’s wrinkles, this ad shows that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and not what mainstream media would have us believe.

Dove is a brand fascinated by the idea of perception. In 2013, its "Real beauty sketches" campaign explored the difference between how others perceive us and how we perceive ourselves. And in June 2016 the #MyBeautyMySay campaign put power back in the hands of women as they stood up for their own beauty and owned the conversation around their appearance.

Interestingly, the brand’s latest spot created by Portuguese agency Black Ship, switches to the male gaze, sparking criticism from those who feel the campaign suggests a woman is only beautiful if a male holds this opinion of her.

Whichever interpretation you choose, the ad’s approach certainly opens up debate and may be one of the reasons it has clocked up over one million views during the first of its release on YouTube.

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