EasyJet tells a love story in 20th anniversary campaign

EasyJet, the budget airline, has released a European campaign marking its 20th anniversary, which asks customers to tell their travel stories.

The TV ad by VCCP features a couple who meet on an EasyJet flight and fall in love.

The ad places them on a ferris wheel, sitting on seats from an EasyJet flight, falling in love, having a child and going on holidays as their daughter grows up. At the end their now grown-up daughter sits next to another man.

The campaign, called 'How 20 Years Have Flown By', aims to inspire the next generation of travellers.

The art direction was handled by Elias Torres, and Daniel Glover James did the copywriting. Mark Zibert directed the spot through Rogue. Media planning and buying was handled by OMD.

EasyJet is also releasing its first TV ad from 1995 on social media. It has offered £29 flights that "costing the same as a pair of jeans".

It is encouraging people to upload their favourite European holiday pictures from the last 20 years to the website 20years.easyjet.com, or on social media. These will be used to create a mosaic.

The campaign will run across TV, out of home, digital, press, cinema and social channels from today.

David Beattie, the creative director at VCCP, said: "Oh, how far we have come! easyJet have become a massive part of many people’s lives over the past 20 years and it has been a real privilege to have been tasked with telling that story in our latest ad.

"The story of a couple growing up with easyJet is a simple one but one I hope resonates with lots of us."

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