EDITORIAL: Buonaguidi’s detractors miss point of his C4 role

Never underestimate the conservatism of the UK ad industry: it is likely to account for any dismay that greets Dave Buonaguidi’s appointment as Channel 4’s in-house creative director. Producing channel idents and programme promos would be infra dig for the majority of agency creatives.

Never underestimate the conservatism of the UK ad industry: it is

likely to account for any dismay that greets Dave Buonaguidi’s

appointment as Channel 4’s in-house creative director. Producing channel

idents and programme promos would be infra dig for the majority of

agency creatives.



It isn’t ’pure’ advertising, doesn’t win awards and, worst of all, it’s

likely to turn you into an adland outcast.



So it won’t be any surprise if the defection of the St Luke’s creative

director attracts some disdainful and misplaced comments from people who

ought to know better. In truth, Buonaguidi has a important job to

do.



In a market set to explode with the digital revolution, Channel 4 has to

fight for share of audience at a time when total viewing time is in

decline.



Staying in touch with their target audiences has never been so important

for TV organisations, whose challenges are quite different from those

facing any consumer goods manufacturer.



Buonaguidi’s arrival must be seen as part of a wider plan by Channel 4

to market aggressively for audience share and advertisers’ money. Never

has it been more important for the station to have clear branding and to

speak with a consistent voice.



Channel 4 has already laid down its marker by snatching the rights to

Test cricket from under the BBC’s nose. David Brook, its director of

strategy and development, is credited in large measure with securing the

contract and is a sworn enemy of entrenched and conventional

thinking.



He typifies a new breed of client who doesn’t want lofty conversations

with agency executive creative directors but would rather roll up their

sleeves with the department’s young turks. In future, these

relationships will grow in importance - and woe betide any agency that

fails to acknowledge the fact.



Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).