EDITORIAL: IPA’s dull dogs make for dreary awards evening

No prizes for predicting that the IPA Advertising Effectiveness Awards night would not be the most fun-filled occasion. After all, this was to be the event at which the UK ad industry showed its clients how seriously it took their business. It ended up showing how over-seriously it has begun to take itself.

No prizes for predicting that the IPA Advertising Effectiveness

Awards night would not be the most fun-filled occasion. After all, this

was to be the event at which the UK ad industry showed its clients how

seriously it took their business. It ended up showing how over-seriously

it has begun to take itself.



Determined to claim its members’ place at the clients’ right hand by

restoring and extending advertising’s status, the IPA seemed intent on

turning the London Hilton into a humour-free zone.



Long, dreary speeches hammered home the same points so many times that

clients among the audience must have been wondering whether the welter

of words was smoke-screening much insecurity. Particularly over the

march of the management consultants into agency territory, a threat oft

trumpeted by Graham Hinton, the IPA president, but which few agency

chiefs appear to be losing sleep over.



In attempting to ensure it is on the clients’ wavelength, the industry

is in danger of becoming a bunch of boring sobersides. It’s one thing to

overhaul the awards in order to ensure clients continue taking them

seriously. It’s quite another to suppress the effervescence and

non-conformity that allow agencies to weave their magic.



Nobody suggests that a night on which advertising effectiveness is

honoured should be like creative awards in their uninhibited and

industry-focused approach. But that doesn’t mean the hectoring shouldn’t

be turned down and the humour turned up. None of the clients at last

week’s event needed to be sold the idea that good advertising works.



All the more reason why the effectiveness awards should be an occasion

for the industry not only to present outstanding case histories but to

showcase the creativity that made their success possible. That ought to

put a smile on everyone’s face.



Topics

Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).