EXPERT’S VIEW: THE MAIL ON SUNDAY - A relaunched Night & Day lends weight to the paper’s output

At 3pm on Sunday, I was driving around in the rain, trying to find a copy of The Mail on Sunday - which I eventually tracked down at my local Shell garage. After the effort of buying it, I was looking forward to a substantial read, now that two extra sections have been added to the regular package.

At 3pm on Sunday, I was driving around in the rain, trying to find

a copy of The Mail on Sunday - which I eventually tracked down at my

local Shell garage. After the effort of buying it, I was looking forward

to a substantial read, now that two extra sections have been added to

the regular package.



In the interests of professionalism, I thought I should look at the

entire package. With the exception of the brilliant You magazine, the

rest of the paper seems bland - but maybe I’ve missed the point and a

bit of blandness is what’s required on a Sunday.



The two sections that have been introduced - a relaunched Night & Day

and Review - are substantial reads. And as far as added-value goes, they

score highly. They have well-known, high-profile journalists writing for

them and their editorial standards are high. Of the two, the new look

Night & Day is the piece de resistance. It has the glossy paper, the

frothy celebrity features and TV listings.



In fact, it has most of the things that The Mail on Sunday does so well.

And as a concession to the 90s, a page on the latest internet crazes has

been introduced.



One item I was surprised to find was ’A Lay in the Life of...’ A woman

describes her first shag, post-divorce, with her ski-instructor. Maybe

this is an example of the eclectic mix of editorial.



Next to Night & Day is the new Review section. This houses the worthier

pieces plus reviews that are well-written and incisive.



With the introduction of ’added-value’ sections prevalent among most

newspapers, these improvements deserve some respect. They are

well-thought through, in keeping with the rest of the paper and may even

attract new readers - which is no mean feat these days.



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