FACES TO WATCH 2002: They're very hot and they're working at an agency, media owner, buyer or production house near you. Camilla Palmer profiles adland's future stars

They're sharp-minded, energetic and highly focused and they're part

of a generation which sees personal fulfilment as at least of equal

importance to a high-flying career, if not more so.



They're Campaign's Faces to Watch for 2002 and they are a real headache

for the agencies, media independents and film production companies that

employ them.



They've got talent in spades as well as an interest in and an ability to

think well beyond their core disciplines. And that's the problem. Faces

to Watch have aspirations that communications companies are finding

increasingly difficult to satisfy, but will have to do so if the

industry is to hang on to its brightest stars.



Society has changed and, in common with many other industries, adland is

feeling its impact. Ad agencies have never provided jobs for life but

young people entering the business a few years ago usually expected

their working lives to be spent in it.



No longer. Bright young stars are as likely to seek a new challenge not

just by switching agencies but by a complete change of lifestyle and

career.



"Young people coming into the business now may take time out to go

travelling in Patagonia, come home and train to be teachers," Grant

Duncan, the Publicis managing director, says. "They have a different

take on the quality of life which is hard to argue against."



The upshot of all this is that agencies will have to be more flexible

and accommodating to the best young talent. Publicis is holding open a

job for one of its bright new suits while he studies for an MBA and is

giving first refusal on a job to an excellent young account manager when

she returns from seeing the world.



It's a trend that's been fuelled partly by the economic prosperity which

has allowed young people to take career breaks safe in the knowledge

that there will be a job for them on their return and partly by more

pragmatic attitudes.



"Young people still enter the business rosy-eyed but sometimes change

once inside," Belinda Kent-Lemon, an ad industry human resources expert,

claims.



Here then are Campaign's latest tips for the top. May the industry

cherish them and their kind. Because they hold its future in their

hands.



1. JANE LINGHAM 25



Partners BDDH



Lingham wrote a Grand Prix-winning entry for Transport for London at the

Account Planning Group awards this year - not bad for a 25-year-old with

just three years' experience under her belt. Partners BDDH is her first

agency, but she's been tipped for a planning director role within the

next five years. Lingham joined straight from gaining a marketing degree

at Lancaster University and her boss, Nigel Long, claims she knew she

wanted to be a planner from the age of 16. "She's interested in

psychology and what makes consumers tick," he says.



2. MICHAEL PRING 29



Miles Calcraft Briginshaw Duffy



Pring joined MCBD in June from D'Arcy, where he started as a graduate

trainee and was soon picked for a fast-track development scheme at the

network. Since arriving at MCBD, he's worked on Benecol and Thorntons

and played a key role in securing the agency's place on the COI

Communications roster. The chief executive, Jeremy Miles, says he is

"phenomenally bright, and obsessed with getting the best creative

work".



3. SAMEER MODHA 27



J. Walter Thompson



Modha has a rare ability to help creative people deliver great work,

JWT's planning director, Marco Rimini, says, but he is as comfortable

working in the statistical and effectiveness arena too. A product of the

WPP fast-track grad scheme, Modha did a year's stint at The Henley

Centre and the design agency Coley Porter Bell before returning to JWT

three years ago. Since then, Rimini says he continues to shine as an

"imaginative and rigorous" planner who could be destined for great

things within WPP.



4. ADAM PACE 28



Optimedia



Pace is the marathon-running group head of Optimedia's TV and internet

buying department, i-trade. He joined the agency in June 2000 after

previous stints at TMD, MediaVest and Initiative Media and has

overwhelmed the managing partner, Greg Turzynski, with his ability to

turn his hand at developing internet buying as well as TV. "He embraced

the sector wholeheartedly, taking the basic skills of TV buying and

adapting them for the web. He has a great can-do attitude."



5. NICOLAI FUGLSIG 28



Outsider



Having notched up a celebrated career in war photojournalism and

documentary-making, Fuglsig joined Outsider in June 2001 after showing

the managing director, Robert Campbell, his reel. "I was totally blown

away," Campbell recalls. "There were no ads on the tape, but everything

he showed me was so fantastically put together and so imaginative it was

quite evident that he would be a remarkable commercials director."



6. MARTIN SMITH 30



Bates UK



It's not everyone in adland who prompts a description as a stellar

high-flier. But Smith, an account planner at Bates UK, does. Tim

Broadbent, the executive planning director, says he is both instinctive

and independent and, as a result, enjoys good results and relationships

with clients and colleagues at the agency. "Creatives smile with

pleasure when they get a brief from him. He knows planning is about the

quality of the ideas, not the quality of the research," Broadbent

says.



7. TOBY MCDONALD 26



The Paul Weiland Film Company



The "quiet and quietly spoken" McDonald has come a long way since he

started as a runner at the commercials production company And Howe Films

in 1995. He quickly moved on to assist on various documentaries before

working on a feature film and directing his own short film, Je t'aime

John Wayne. The short was nominated for a Bafta last year and caught the

eye of The Paul Weiland Film Company, which snapped him up

immediately.



8. MATT LEE 30



Brian Riley 30



Banks Hoggins O'Shea/FCB



This creative duo is behind campaigns for Coors, Ladbrokes, MTV and

Compaq Computers at Banks Hoggins, and has been at the agency for two

years. The creative director, Ken Hoggins, likes their leftfield

approach to a brief and considers their rounded view an incredible

asset: "What they come up with is always interesting instead of

predictable and they're good at tackling briefs sideways as well as

head-on."



9. ANDY MORLEY 32



Emap Advertising



"Andy stands out in a crowd," Emap Advertising's sales director, Dave

King, says. "Which is good for a salesman," he adds. Morley joined Emap

four years after working for Capital Radio's in-house radio sales

company, MS&M, and is now an account team manager working across a large

portfolio of clients. He recently introduced agency assessments and

better customer support services. "He's energetic, confident, funny -

people like that - and he also cares massively about what happens to the

company," King says.



10 SEBASTIAN ROYCE 28



Glue London



This 28-year-old creative director was previously at Ogilvy & Mather

before going digital. His six years at a leading traditional agency has

made the transition easy and he's now one of Glue's strongest assets,

according to the managing director, Mark Cridge, himself a Face to Watch

from 2001. Cridge says the agency had been looking for a creative

director for some time from a traditional advertising background and

knew instantly that Royce was right for the job. "We clicked, and he got

what we are about straight away."



11. IAN PEARMAN 27



AMV BBDO



Account director Pearman spent late December dressed as Father Christmas

at AMV which, according to the managing director, Cilla Snowball,

demonstrates his ability to excel at whatever he does. "Whether it's

giving out presents to the agency's children or running

multimillion-pound bits of business, Ian shows enormous talent,"she

says. He runs the graduate recruitment scheme and also works on BT,

Famous Grouse, Genie and Ignite.



12. FIONA TYRELL 25



AMV BBDO



Tyrell will "fall over backwards" on reading her name as a Face to

Watch, according to the managing director, Cilla Snowball. "She is

incredibly modest - it's as big as her talent," she says. Tyrell has

been with AMV for barely 18 months since being plucked via the milk

round from Durham University where she studied Spanish, Italian and

theology. Since she joined, she's been working "flat out" on Dulux -

shortlisted as Campaign's Campaign of the Year for 2001 - and BT,

winning her fanmail from clients.



13. ANTONY GOLDSTEIN 28



GAVIN LESTER 28



Bartle Bogle Hegarty



This duo is fast becoming a lynchpin of BBH's creative department.

Formerly at Euro RSCG Wnek Gosper, they joined BBH in late 2000 and

since then have worked on Impulse, Warburton's and Lynx as well as

creating the latest Levi's ad, airing next month. The creative director,

John O'Keeffe, remembers their first day at work. "They turned up with a

ready-made radio ad for Lynx, which was on air by the next week. I

thought, 'Blimey'."



14. ORLANDO HOOPER-GREENHILL 29



Duckworth Finn Grubb Waters



"We hired Orlando because he's good at table football and his name adds

a touch of class to the phone directory," laughs the DFGW joint managing

director and planner, Hugh Cameron. "He's the kind of planner with the

right attitude and has a broad, easy approach. He's very talented, but

understated too," he adds in a more serious tone. Since joining DFGW at

the tail-end of 2001, Hooper-Greenhill has been working on key clients

such as Daewoo, Mytravel (formerly Airtours) and the BBC.



15. OLLY TAYLOR 28



Fallon



The fact that planner Olly Taylor works on accounts such as Ben &

Jerry's, Starbucks and Radio 1 is no surprise to anyone who knows him,

according to his boss, the Fallon planning director, Lawrence Green.

"He's a person who fits those accounts perfectly - he's young and has a

great sense of creativity," he says. Green hired Taylor six months ago

from D'Arcy, where he worked on Fiat, but claims his creativity had been

noted long before.



16. MARK HANSON 29



KRISTIAN FOY 25



Partners Andrews Aldridge



Art director Hanson and copywriter Foy have been at the agency since

leaving college three years ago and taking a placement under the

supervision of the creative director, Steve Aldridge. "It was obvious

when they started to produce work that they fitted in here," Aldridge

remembers. "Normally, creatives fresh out of college flap around; these

two didn't. We were impressed by the way they worked, even with so

little experience."



17, CARL RINSCH 24



RSA Films



Carl Erik Rinsch is a star signing at RSA Films, with three ads for big

agencies under his belt and scripts flooding in every day, according to

the managing director, Adrian Harrison. Harrison added him to the books

in early 2001 on the strength of three test ads made by US-born Rinsch,

which impressed him with their "confidence and imagination. I was amazed

at his ability to handle actors."



FACES WE WATCHED IN 2001



JAMIE LABATE



Labate left Associated Newspapers to go travelling in April last year.

He is planning to find another sales position on his return.



MATT HARDISTY



New-media guru Hardisty is still very much in the thick of things at

Naked, where his position doesn't seem to have been affected by the

dotcom downturn. He's recently focused on event organisation, according

to John Harlow, who describes him as "a super eccentric genius".



TRACY BLACHER



Blacher has remained at Microsoft where she's been rewarded with a

promotion to consumer marketing manager for MSN. She now controls all

brand marketing for the network and recently worked on the biggest

online Christmas campaign yet launched.



LAURIE SMITH AND MATT PAM



Smith and Pam left Alphabet, landing themselves a placement at Bartle

Bogle Hegarty from where they were snapped up by Clemmow Hornby Inge as

the sparky start-up's first creative hiring.



DANNY JOSEPHS



Josephs gave up his business director title at Ogilvy & Mather to become

another of CHI's early signings. The move reunited him with Johnny

Hornby and Simon Clemmow, for whom Josephs worked at TBWA/London before

jumping ship to O&M.



SUZANN HAILS AND ALASTAIR CAMPBELL



Hails and Campbell have enjoyed another prolific year at St Luke's,

working on campaigns for Ikea, Quorn, Rizazz and Fox's Biscuits.



CAMERON SAUNDERS



Saunders was promoted to the WCRS board last year and continues as a

planning authority at the agency. During the past 12 months, he's worked

on the agency's successful pitches for Vizzavi and Heinz Baby Food - as

well as a topless appearance on the Campaign Diary page.



MICHAEL JONES



Lowe Direct's art director left the UK for the temptation of sun-soaked

beaches and a more integrated environment at Saatchi & Saatchi in

Sydney. As an art director at the agency, Jones will work both above and

below the line.



JONATHAN THAKE AND LEE TAN



The creative duo remain at HHCL & Partners, surviving a round of

redundancies this year. They'll be hoping more briefs come the agency's

way in 2002.



TOM MORTON



Morton's reputation as a planner at BMP caught the attention of Rainey

Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, which snapped him up for the role of board

account planner in August last year. Since then he's concentrated on the

agency's Virgin Mobile account.



GERRY BOYLE



Boyle continues as head of planning at Zenith - and one of the most

talked about planners in London. He was placed eighth in Campaign's

top-ten planners of 2001 - for the second year running. Nuff said.



KATE WILSNER



Fallon's Wilsher was promoted to account director last year and now runs

the Starbucks, Skoda and Umbro accounts.



MARK CRIDGE



Living up to the agency's name, Cridge has stuck to Glue London through

the turbulence of last year and the collapse of the parent company,

DeepGroup. He was promoted from creative director to managing director

in February.



GRANT MILLAR



Millar has continued to go from strength to strength at BT Retail, where

he was promoted to head of media last month in recognition of his work

developing BT's approach to the discipline as media strategy

manager.



CAROLINE PAY



Pay and her creative partner, Kim Gehrig, are continuing to bolster

their portfolio at Mother. The pair worked on Organics and Batchelors

Cup-a-Soup.



CECILIA DUFILS AND MARKUS BJURMAN



The other creative team on last year's Faces to Watch from Mother left

for the Amsterdam-based KesselsKramer after producing the controversial

yet award-winning flyposter work for Britart.com. "Never say never,"

Stef Calcraft says of the prospect of them returning to the agency.



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