FOOD ILLUSTRATED: AN EXPERT’S VIEW - There must be life after Eat Soup when food looks this good, Stefano Hatfield says

Ever had the niggling suspicion that the Data Protection Act isn’t working for you? I never lost much sleep about it myself until Food Illustrated launched, bringing with it the realisation that John Brown Publishing must have acquired my consumer profile via a database.

Ever had the niggling suspicion that the Data Protection Act isn’t

working for you? I never lost much sleep about it myself until Food

Illustrated launched, bringing with it the realisation that John Brown

Publishing must have acquired my consumer profile via a database.



If ever a magazine was designed for me then Food Illustrated is it.

Stunning food photography, interesting but accessible recipes, features

on everything foodie from the world’s most stylish deli (New York’s Dean

& Deluca) to the excellent Nigel Slater on chicken soup, a street market

in Bolivia and cheese-making in Ireland.



The boldness of its art direction is key. Page after full page of

mouth-watering portraits. Warm watercress salad, griddled leeks nicoise,

and duck with chilli-fried kale never looked so good. A double-page

cloudy sunset over west Cork stopped me in my tracks. It’s confident

stuff. A 132-page amuse bouche for top nosh. Salivating, I want to go

out now, buy the ingredients and cook up a storm.



But how many ’me’s are there? After the sad demise of Eat Soup, has the

food bubble burst? Food Illustrated is several notches upmarket of the

Loaded clone, but it launches at the height of the food-as-fashion fad.

It felt a little light on ads.



Future advertisers must surely be more Smeg than McVitie’s.



Minor quibbles: there could be more news and views on restaurant food

and there’s not much to read. Visually, it oozes a passion for food that

is let down a little by a lack of opinion or debate.



Right now, however, it seems to be the magazine for the moment. If I

described it as a cross between World of Interiors and Sainsbury’s the

Magazine, I couldn’t be paying it a greater compliment.