Future rebrands Jetix Magazine as Nitro!

LONDON - Future, the special interest publisher, is overhauling Jetix Magazine and renaming the kids' offering as Nitro!, with a broader remit to include all major children's TV content while retaining its focus on five to 13-year-old boys.

James Binns: publishing director for Future's games and kids' titles
James Binns: publishing director for Future's games and kids' titles

The new-look magazine will go on sale from 3 September and retain its cover price of £2.99

Future's decision to rename the title follows Disney taking on full ownership of Jetix Europe in 2008 and subsequently deciding in the UK to replace it with a new channel, Disney XD.

Jetix Magazine was an offshoot brand of the TV broadcaster. Now under the Nitro! brand, it will be independent of Disney.

Future said it will retain its stance on giving away four gifts per issue.

James Binns, publishing director of Future's games and kids' titles, said: "Our team has enjoyed four fantastic years working with Jetix, but now the TV channel is rebranding and Future is grabbing the opportunity to develop a new, fully owned property."

According to its last ABC figure, in the period July to December 2005, Jetix Magazine recorded a circulation of 23,054.

 

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