General Mills calls Nature Valley ad review

General Mills is reviewing the pan-European ad account for its Nature Valley cereal bar brand, including the £12 million UK business.

Nature Valley: ad review
Nature Valley: ad review

Rosie Doggett, the independent marketing procurement consultant at RAD Consulting, is handling the process.

Work Club is the incumbent on the UK account, having been appointed to the integrated business in October last year after a pitch. The agency also handles digital advertising for the General Mills brands Häagen-Dazs and Old El Paso, which are unaffected by the review.

Saatchi & Saatchi, a General Mills roster agency, works for Nature Valley on a global basis. The brand is thought to be reviewing its creative duties in Australia.

General Mills launched Nature Valley in the UK in 2006, but has recently supported the brand with increased marketing investment. Work Club, the brand’s first retained agency in the UK, will not pitch for the pan-European creative but will continue to handle digital activity.

This week, Nature Valley unveiled a major promotion, distributing free cereal bars at London Underground stations to support its status as the official supplier of cereal bars to London 2012.

Nature Valley launched a TV ad earlier this year that showed city dwellers falling into a farmer’s field as they ate their Nature Valley bars.

Before the brand launched its first foray into TV advertising, its marketing activity included sponsorship of AA’s 50 Walks Of 2-10 Miles guidebooks in an effort to associate the snack bar with outdoor pursuits.

Nature Valley was unavailable for comment.

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats
Shares0
Share

1 Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats

Forging an emotional tie with consumers is one of the strongest ways to protect your brand. Products can be copycatted, but the distinctive identity of a true brand can never be replicated argues Nir Wegrzyn, CEO of BrandOpus.

Just published