Feature

Global Power List 2010: A - B

Campaign's first Global Power List is intended to be the ultimate world media Who's Who in 2010.

In these pages, you will find creatives and directors from the most-awarded advertising agencies in the world, figures from the world's most influential magazines, leading executives from the top media organisations, global CMOs at the world's biggest and most-awarded advertisers, analysts covering the media arena, CEOs and CFOs at the top advertising and media networks. Oh, and some fun media influencers such as Perez Hilton and the Beckhams.

Your views on the entries and the inevitable occasional omission are welcomed at campaign@haymarket.com.

AGON, JEAN-PAUL

Job: CEO

Company: L'Oreal SA

Age: 54

Killer power fact

In a century, L'Oreal has moved from a purely French export business to a major international group in 130 countries around the world. For his part in this, and more, Agon was awarded the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur, France's most prestigious award, in 2007.

Path to power

Agon joined the company straight from business school in 1978. He ran L'Oreal Paris, then L'Oreal Germany and set up operations in Asia. In 2001 he took over the group's largest subsidiary, L'Oreal USA, moving to overall CEO in 2006.

Deals and deeds

Agon took charge of L'Oreal's Asian division just before the financial crisis in 1998, yet built it into one of L'Oreal's fastest-growing divisions. Now he's charting L'Oreal's path to expand into emerging markets such as China and Brazil. He bought the Body Shop, impressed with its stance on animal testing. L'Oreal's marketing of brands such as Maybelline and Garnier is decentralised, but its spending puts the world's largest cosmetics company in the top five of global advertisers.

What he says

"The world's population is ageing, and that's great, because you use cosmetics longer, and the more you age, the more you need good cosmetics."

What people say

A former marketer himself, Agon is said to be "marketing obsessed".

Would you believe it?

Agon was only 25 when he took on L'Oreal's loss-making subsidiary in Greece.

The year ahead

L'Oreal needs to grow sales after profit for 2009 fell 8 per cent. Europe and the US are the trouble spots, but China is a bright one. L'Oreal continues its global efforts to stop counterfeiters and copycat brands.

AHMED, AJAZ

Job: Chairman and co-founder

Company: AKQA

Age: 37

Killer power fact

He's the godfather of digital marketing and one of the first to bridge the gap between technology and marketing.

Path to power

He set up AKQA (the initials stand for All Known Questions Answered) with three friends after dropping out of university aged 21. His ability to reassure advertisers worried about the internet brought him millionaire status by the age of 24.

Deals and deeds

Under Ahmed, AKQA has steadily extended its global reach from London to San Francisco - where it's now headquartered - to New York, Washington, Amsterdam and Shanghai. In February 2007, the agency sold a majority stake to the US private equity company General Atlantic for a reported $250 million.

What he says

"In general, the ad industry tends to be very conservative. It is very reluctant to change, while the technology industry is about relentless innovation."

What people say

"He's an impressive guy: very confident and very seductive with clients" - Alastair Duncan, CEO of MRM Worldwide.

Would you believe it?

Bloggers at Agency Spy voted Ahmed the second sexiest man in advertising in 2007.

After appearing in The Sunday Times Young Rich List he got several offers of marriage and staff at AKQA's office had to screen calls for weeks afterwards.

The year ahead

Under Ahmed, AKQA has only complacency to fear, having ended 2009 with five separate "agency of the year" titles and the Grand Prix at Cannes. Last year it delivered an impressive new-business performance in which ten new clients, including Panasonic, the Army and Warner Bros, were added to its roster.

AL-WALEED BIN TALAL BIN ABDUL AZIZ AL SAUD, PRINCE

Job: Chairman and CEO

Company: Kingdom Holding

Age: 55

Killer power fact

Prince Al-Waleed is the chairman and CEO of Riyadh-based Kingdom Holding, the majority owner of the Rotana Group, the Arab world's largest media and entertainment company. The pan-Arab conglomerate includes a film production company, record label Rotana Records and 11 TV channels, two of which are in partnership with News Corp.

Path to power

A member of the Saudi royal family, Prince Al-Waleed began his career in 1979 after graduating from Menlo College in the US. He came to the world's attention after buying a substantial number of shares in Citicorp in the 90s and has since amassed a fortune through various investments.

Deals and deeds

In February Prince Al-Waleed sold a 9.09 per cent stake in Rotana to Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for $70 million. News Corp has 18 months after the completion of the deal to double its stake to 18.2 per cent for another $70 million. The prince already owns a 7 per cent stake in News Corp.

What he says

"If I'm going to do something, I do it spectacularly or I don't do it at all."

What people say

Philanthropic and highly connected, Prince Al-Waleed is considered one of the world's most influential Arabs.

Would you believe it?

Last year Saudi clerics issued a fatwa against the owners of satellite broadcasters that air "immoral content". It was widely seen as aimed at the prince.

The year ahead

In an April interview with Bloomberg, the prince said he was eyeing up the possibility of establishing a regional news channel to compete with Al-Arabiya and Al-Jazeera.

ALTMANN, OLIVIER

Job: Chief creative officer

Company: Publicis Worldwide

Age: 46

Killer power fact

Altmann oversees global creative work for Publicis' internationally aligned clients. Giving one person the brief for global creative excellence is the idea of Richard Pinder, the network chief. Pinder's plan is to move the network up The Gunn Report rankings.

Path to power

Altmann's career started at FCB Paris. He left there to help found the hotshop BDDP & Fils before joining Publicis in 2004.

Deals and deeds

His appointment at the end of last year to the position of global creative director (a role that had not been filled since Dave Droga left in 2006) saw Maurice Levy, the chairman and chief executive of the Publicis Groupe, dismantle the network's global creative collective, which was set up as a collegiate system of creative quality control, to make Altmann the overall arbiter of its creative output.

What he says

"I'm not supposed to be the star of the show.

And I don't have a magic wand."

What people say

An associate says: "Olivier is one of those creatives who doesn't have to be a pain in the arse to be effective."

Would you believe it?

Altmann fell in love with advertising at school when his teacher asked him to write a commentary piece on an ad for a Teflon-coated frying pan. He wrote 17 pages instead of one. Fast forward 32 years later and he's now working for the French Teflon utensil-maker Tefal.

The year ahead

As above, it's all about getting the Publicis network into the top five most-awarded networks in The Gunn Report.

AMIN, SALMAN

Job: Global executive VP, sales and marketing

Company: PepsiCo

Killer power fact

Amin heads marketing for PepsiCo, the world's second-largest soft drinks maker and a company that spent $1.4 billion globally on media in 2008.

Path to power

Born in Pakistan, Amin spent ten years in brand management positions at Procter & Gamble working on haircare, as well as food and beverage businesses in the US, Germany, Middle East and Asia. Amin joined PepsiCo in 1995 as the VP, marketing for Pepsi-Cola International, and spent four years as president of PepsiCo UK and Ireland.

Deals and deeds

While PepsiCo UK chief, Amin focused on improving health credentials across PepsiCo's brand portfolio, including Walkers, Doritos and Tropicana. In 2004, Amin was part of the decision by PepsiCo to stop promoting full-sugar Pepsi and focus instead on the non-sugar brands, Pepsi Max and Diet Pepsi. In 2008, Amin signed PepsiCo up to the UK Government's Change4Life anti-obesity drive.

What he says

"The obesity challenge ... will take years to change. But you have to start somewhere, and one of the places you can start is by saying: 'You know what? I'm going to stop promoting my full-sugar products,'" Amin told The Observer, 23 August 2009.

What people say

"Salman is a proven PepsiCo leader who has delivered exceptional results as he has transformed our UK portfolio" - Indra Nooyi, CEO of PepsiCo.

Would you believe it?

Amin's links with Britain stretch back a long way - both his grandfathers studied at the Bar in London.

The year ahead

PepsiCo will continue to try to overtake the market leader, Coca-Cola, with moves into healthier drinks such as its purchase of Tropicana and Gatorade.

ANDERSON, CHRIS

Job: Editor-in-chief, Wired; author of Free and The Long Tail

Company: Conde Nast

Age: 49

Killer power fact

Anderson's book, The Long Tail (published in 2006), foretold the end of the blockbuster and the rise of the niche (or, to put it another way, a rebalancing of the 80:20 rule). It spent weeks on the New York Times bestseller lists and its huge success turned him from a techno geek guru into a business guru for the noughties.

Path to power

A physicist by education, Anderson's journalistic career has taken him from magazines such as Nature, Science and The Economist, where he wrote about the internet, to be editor-in-chief of the Silicon Valley bible, Wired. His second book, Free, explored the economics of free, or near-free, pricing in a world of infinitesimal marginal costs.

Deals and deeds

Multi-talented Anderson has added entrepreneurial strings to his bow, including founding two companies, DIY Drones and 3D Robotics, and launching a parenting blog called GeekDad.

What he says

"I don't use the word 'media'. I don't use the word 'news'. I don't think those words mean anything any more."

What people say

Aside from the controversy over allegations of plagiarism in Free, The Wall Street Journal described the book as "considerably less contentious than one might expect.

Anderson strains to sound provocative, at times, but flirts with absurdity."

Would you believe it?

He dropped out in his early twenties, becoming a bassist in a new wave/indie band before going back to university in his twenties. Do not confuse him with the TED curator Chris Anderson.

The year ahead

To maintain his status, Anderson needs to find another big new idea to match The Long Tail. Word is he's turned his attention to that most analogue of activities, manufacturing.

ASCHEIM, TOM

Job: CEO

Publication: Newsweek

Killer power fact

Newsweek, published from New York and owned by The Washington Post Company, is one of the world's most influential news magazines, unafraid of courting controversy (think of the Sarah Palin cover, or the Guantanamo Bay allegations of 2005).

Path to power

Ascheim spent 17 years at Viacom serving in a variety of roles, rising to the position of executive VP and general manager of Nickelodeon Television, before joining Newsweek.

Deals and deeds

At the start of 2008, Newsweek lowered its rate base, the circulation promised to advertisers, to 2.6 million from 3.1 million and Ascheim has indicated that the rate base is likely to keep dropping.

What he says

"Mass for us is a business that doesn't work. Wish it did, but it doesn't. We did it for a long time, successfully, but we can't any more."

What people say

"Newsweek has to try something big. It's just not profitable under current management" - a New York analyst predicts a change in ownership.

Would you believe it?

The film Harrison's Flowers is the story of a Newsweek photojournalist lost in the war-torn former Yugoslavia.

The year ahead

Editorially, Newsweek's plan calls for moving in the direction it was already headed - towards not just analysis and commentary, but an opinionated, prescriptive or offbeat take on events. The magazine has replaced its thin paper with heavier stock designed to be more appealing to advertisers and readers.

B

BABINET, REMI

Job: Worldwide chief creative officer

Company: Euro RSCG

Age: 52

Killer power fact

BETC Euro RSCG has been named "most creative French advertising agency" 11 times in 15 years, and its clients include the country's big spenders - Evian, Air France, Peugeot, Canal +, Petit Bateau, Lacoste.

Path to power

Babinet founded BETC Paris in 1994, and the agency has quickly become one of the most influential creative shops in the world. Between 2003 and 2007 he was named president of the French Art Directors Club, and was guest editor of The Gunn Report in 2008.

Deals and deeds

Under Babinet's creative guidance, BETC Euro RSCG devised an internet phenomenon in "roller babies", a viral campaign for Evian that has been recognised by the Guinness World Records as the most viewed online ad of all time - 45 million views at last count.

What he says

"My job is to be a role model for others, and if I'm going to be that, then my own agency must be seen to be doing good work."

What people say

"That bastard Babinet"- the founder of Mother London, Robert Saville, speaking - totally tongue in cheek - about Babinet's ability to achieve great creative work with a "warmth and humility lacking in too many people in this industry".

Would you believe it?

Babinet regularly works with his agency's production department to organise PANIK parties, huge Parisian events showcasing the best new talent in rock and electronic music.

The year ahead

The "roller babies" ad helped put Euro RSCG back on the creative agenda again. The network will be looking to Babinet to keep it there.

BAHL, RAGHAV

Job: Founder and MD

Company: Network 18

Age: 50

Killer power fact

Bahl was one of the first Indians to foresee the explosion of television in the world's fastest-growing democracy. He was at the right place at the right time when he launched TV 18, his production house.

Path to power

Journalistic prowess helped cement his reputation as an authoritative anchor for current affairs shows, making him one of the most trusted names on Indian TV in the early 90s and being recognised as a possible partner by CNBC. That deal catapulted TV18's reputation.

Deals and deeds

A consummate deal-maker, Bahl has taken the partnership route to growing his empire. Beginning with CNBC, Bahl's partners reads like a Who's Who of the international media landscape: CNN, Viacom, CNBC and Forbes. His latest victory is the successful launch of the Indian edition of Forbes.

What he says

"I wear two hats - as an editor I am very online and operational. I like to do it because I believe I do it well - that is my operative role. The other is as an entrepreneur in the company, which is strategy, finance, and communication to the world."

What people say

"Un-put-down-able!" - KV Kamath, the former MD of ICICI Bank, on Bahl's new book.

Would you believe it?

Bahl began his career as a management consultant with AF Ferguson before moving to sell credit cards at American Express.

After this he found his true calling in media.

The year ahead

His biggest gamble, Colors, the Viacom-partnered general entertainment channel, will be entering its second year and hoping its success continues.

BALLMER, STEVE

Job: CEO

Company: Microsoft

Age: 54

Killer power fact

He's the man behind Bing, the first real competitor to Google. In the most recent Forbes rich list, published back in March, he had risen by ten places in a year to 33rd richest man on the planet, with a net wealth of $11 billion.

Path to power

He was at Harvard with Bill Gates and joined Microsoft, as its 24th employee, following an early stint at Procter & Gamble. He headed several divisions at Microsoft before becoming chief executive in 2000.

Deals and deeds

The most important acquisition last year was arguably Interactive Supercomputing, a company that specialises in bringing the power of parallel computing to desktops. But Ballmer currently sees his role mainly in terms of repurposing the company philosophically to meets the demands of what he calls "cloud computing".

What he says

"That is the most expensive phone in the world and it doesn't appeal to business customers because it doesn't have a keyboard, which makes it not-a-very-good e-mail machine." Ballmer predicts that the iPhone launch will prove a disaster.

What people say

"(Microsoft founder Bill) Gates is over the top, but Ballmer's mad, he's insane" - Bill Joy, the co-founder of Sun Microsystems, puts Ballmer's legendary enthusiasm into context.

Would you believe it?

Last year, he launched a ("pretend") attack on a Microsoft employee who tried to take a picture of him using an iPhone at a company event.

The year ahead

He's betting the future of the company on the evolution of "cloud computing".

BALSARA, SAM

Job: Chairman and MD

Company: Madison World

Age: 59

Killer power fact

The chairman of a communications group spread across India, Sri Lanka and Thailand, Balsara is a master at building relationships.

Path to power

Balsara began his career in the marketing department of a small FMCG company. Wanting to start his own business in advertising, he mapped a path for himself that saw him gain experience as a client, as a decision-maker and as a deal-maker. That's the hallmark of Balsara: planning and patience.

Deals and deeds

Balsara pulled off the deal of his life when he bought a 51 per cent stake in MediaCom from WPP and immediately won the Procter & Gamble media mandate for India. His annual predictions on developing trends in the media are eagerly awaited.

What he says

"I cannot think of a year where the ad pie has shrunk the way it did in 2009. The fall is even more dramatic when we consider the fact that the industry grew by an average rate of 15-18 per cent over the five-year period - 2004 to 2008. Nobody could have anticipated this sharp a fall."

What people say

"Unassuming, affable, and a charmer, the soft-spoken Balsara hit the headlines in April 2008 with a spectacular deal that made the media world sit up" - a reporter on his purchase of that 51 per cent stake in MediaCom in India.

Would you believe it?

Balsara continues to live in his ancestral house in suburban Mumbai, despite his extraordinary success.

The year ahead

Thumbs-up. This is a good year for MediaCom (and therefore for Balsara) as Unilever and Procter & Gamble get ready for their biggest battle in India. Significant spend hikes expected.

BARCLAY, SIR DAVID AND SIR FREDERICK

Jobs: Owners (and identical twin brothers)

Company: Press Holdings (The Business, The Spectator and Telegraph titles)

Ages: 75

Killer power fact

Their Daily Telegraph newspaper is still (despite the best efforts of Rupert Murdoch's Times over recent years) the UK's biggest-selling daily quality paper.

Path to power

The twins used the fortune they made in property development to buy newspapers, latterly the Telegraph and the Sunday Telegraph in 2004.

Deals and deeds

They pumped £40 million into the Telegraph Media Group last year - to "tidy up" its accounts after the revelation that it lost £33 million in 2008.

What they say

They never give interviews - but those who've met them insist that, in private, they are rather outgoing.

What people say

"(They have been) less than fully candid" - Delaware judge Leo Strine, in trying to untangle the deal by which they acquired the Telegraph titles from Conrad Black, was less than impressed.

Would you believe it?

They have created an isolated feudal kingdom for themselves on Brecqhou, a small island they own in the English Channel.

The year ahead

The Barclays may put media strategy on the back burner as they continue to focus on retail - last year, their Shop Direct company purchased the Woolworths Group in the UK.

BARTZ, CAROL

Job: CEO

Company: Yahoo!

Age: 61

Killer power fact

Bartz was 12th on the Forbes 100 list of the most powerful women in the world in 2009. Yahoo!'s alliance with Microsoft is being closely watched. Observers want to know if it's a desperate strategy to stem Google's advance or a genuine way forward?

Path to power

Bartz worked her way up through technology companies, including Digital Equipment Corporation and Sun Microsystems. She was appointed the CEO of software developer Autodesk in 1992, transforming it into a market-leading company. She was moved to her current job, succeeding the Yahoo! co-founder Jerry Yang, in January 2009.

Deals and deeds

She spent the past year reorganising the company, making job cuts and instigating a radical redesign of the website, backed by a substantial marketing campaign.

What she says

"More than anything, let's give this company some friggin' breathing room" - Bartz makes an impassioned plea during her first press conference after joining.

What people say

"It's not yet clear if Bartz can turn Yahoo! around no matter how good she may be" - an editorial in Businessweek argued that Yahoo!'s structural problems are deep-rooted.

Would you believe it?

Perhaps uniquely for such a high-powered executive, her hobbies include gardening.

The year ahead

Bartz will be praying that Yahoo!'s strategic partnership with Microsoft will really begin taking the search engine fight to Google - and that the relaunch of its site succeeds in pleasing its large user base. Some observers, however, don't believe she'll last out the year.

BASCOBERT, PAUL

Job: President

Publication: Bloomberg Businessweek

Age: 45

Killer power fact

He is responsible for the strategy and revenue of the recently relaunched Bloomberg Businessweek, a marriage between the financial-information company Bloomberg LP and the weekly magazine.

Path to power

Bascobert joined Bloomberg Businessweek from Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corporation, where he was chief marketing officer for the Consumer Media Group.

Deals and deeds

He is credited with increasing circulation and creating new revenue opportunities for The Wall Street Journal, Barron's, WSJ.com, MarketWatch.com and Barrons.com.

What he says

"As we looked to reinvent the business magazine, we found that it's more than just changing the navigation or design. We had to substantially improve the value proposition to the consumer."

What people say

"Under his leadership, we expect the business to grow." Bloomberg LP chairman Peter T Grauer, on Bascobert's appointment.

Would you believe it?

He began his career as a systems engineer at General Motors. He holds a degree in Electrical Engineering from Kettering University and an MBA in Finance & Marketing from Wharton.

The year ahead

In a very competitive market, all eyes are on the new-look publication.

BAYNES, MARK R

Job: VP and global chief marketing officer

Company: Kellogg

Age: 49

Killer power fact

Twenty-year Kellogg veteran Baynes has risen steadily up the ranks to the ultimate job, presiding over a resurgent number of brands and a welcome embrace of digital media. And he controls a $1 billion-plus budget.

Path to power

Starting as a senior brand manager with Kellogg in the UK in 1990, Baynes has filled most roles in the Kellogg marketing world, including new-product development, innovation, convenience foods and breakfast foods. He moved to the US in 2000, and took on his current global job, adding membership of the global leadership team in 2008.

Deals and deeds

Baynes made his mark at Kellogg by acknowledging the need to make his company's products healthier and taking an industry-leading stand by placing curbs on any marketing activities aimed at children under 12.

What he says

Baynes has been frank about the declining power of TV relative to other media. "Analysis of the Special K media initiative of the last 18 months showed digital media exceeding that of broadcast return on investment," he told investors.

What people say

"By committing to these (nutritional) standards, Kellogg has vaulted over the rest of the food industry" - Michael F Jacobson, the executive director of the US's Center for Science in the Public Interest.

Would you believe it?

Baynes described Tony the Tiger, the Frosties icon killed off in 2007, as a "bit of a buffoon in the mid-late 90s" - a fairly damning obituary.

The year ahead

More of the same for Baynes. He will be pushing ahead with new, healthier, products and speeding up the digital innovation.

BECHT, BART

Job: CEO

Company: Reckitt Benckiser

Age: 53

Killer power fact

Under Becht's leadership, RB's shares have doubled in value over the past five years. It is a top ten global spender on marketing, splashing nearly $2.4 billion on media worldwide in 2008, according to Nielsen.

Path to power

Dutch Becht has an MBA from the University of Chicago and joined Benckiser in 1988 from Procter & Gamble.

After the merger in 1999 of Benckiser with the UK's Reckitt & Coleman, Becht took control of the combined company.

Deals and deeds

Becht has focused on brands that are truly global and on product innovation. Four years ago he brought Nurofen and Strepsils into the fold. Unlike bigger rivals P&G and Unilever, Reckitt managed to grow US sales in 2009 with the marketing of its 17 so-called "power brands", including Cillit Bang, Clearasil, Veet and Calgon.

What he says

Publicity-shy Becht believes "a high profile normally goes with taking the credit and that would send the wrong message".

What people say

Taking pot-shots at Becht's huge salary (see below) is cheap, writes Mark Kleinman in The Times. "An examination of total shareholder return produced by the company during Mr Becht's period at the helm shows that he has been one of the top-performing FTSE 100 chief executives of the past decade."

Would you believe it?

Becht is one of the highest paid executives in the world. In 2009 his package totalled £90 million in cash and shares, some of which he has donated to a charitable trust. He claims to do all the cleaning at his home in Berkshire.

The year ahead

Full steam ahead as R&B plays catch-up on its two main rivals P&G and Unilever.

BECKER, WENDY

Job: Group chief marketing officer

Company: Vodafone

Age: 43

Killer power fact

Becker sits on Vodafone's executive committee, and is in charge of expanding the brand in more than 20 countries. She also sits on the board of Whitbread as its only female non-executive director.

Path to power

US-born Becker is a McKinsey alumnus, where she was responsible for the consultancy's UK consumer practice. (Also alumni are her husband and Vittorio Colao, the CEO of Vodafone: spot that McKinsey diaspora at work.) Fourteen years after leaving The Firm, Becker became MD at Carphone Warehouse's TalkTalk, and in 2009 Vodafone hired her.

Deals and deeds

As the new broom at Vodafone Becker has swept away its global marketing set-up with high-profile departures and 90 jobs lost in the UK, Denmark and Germany. Vodafone's review of its mobile ad business - under threat from Apple and Google - is also being led by Becker.

What she says

"We've invested heavily in customer service and we'll be applying these learnings very quickly," Becker said after a period in which TalkTalk's approach to customers made it a laughing stock.

What people say

Becker is a "feisty" operator, the FT said in its report of her revamp of Vodafone's marketing.

Would you believe it?

At Dartmouth College in the mid-80s, Becker was the first woman leader of the student assembly at the famously male-dominated Ivy League university.

The year ahead

Becker and Vodafone need to balance cost-reduction with innovation and differentiation. It must capitalise on success in newer markets such as India and on new revenue streams such as its app shop.

BECKHAM, DAVID AND VICTORIA

Jobs: Footballer/WAG-designer

Ages: 35 and 36

Killer power fact

The Beckhams are a power couple with global appeal straddling the worlds of sport, fashion, entertainment and popular culture. He has twice been Google's most searched-for sports personality. She defines the term WAG.

Path to power

He has combined his footballing prowess with his looks to become the world's most commercially savvy sportsman.

Deals and deeds

He shot to fame with Manchester United and England between 1995 and 2003. Thanks to the Spice Girls, her fame initially overshadowed his. Following the demise of her music career, she has re-invented herself as a style icon and designer.

What they say

He said of his move to the US: "I'm coming over here to make a difference." She said of the Spice Girls that (the band) "opened a lot of doors to me - and closed a lot too".

What people say

"He's a walking trademark ... whose name is as instantly recognisable as that of multinationals such as Coca-Cola and IBM," brand experts say. Others describe him as a "mannequin as much as a midfielder".

Would you believe it?

In the first six months of Beckham's career at Real Madrid, the club sold one million replica shirts. When they first met, she didn't know who he was.

The year ahead

A career-threatening injury puts the spotlight on the moment he must surely have dreaded - what he does next. Her success post-Spice Girls may provide a model to follow.

BERLUSCONI, SILVIO

Title: Prime Minister, Italy

Company: Fininvest (owns controlling stake in Mediaset)

Age: 73

Killer power fact

Via Fininvest, Berlusconi and his family control many of Italy's plum media assets. Through his premiership, he also indirectly has huge influence over the Italian state broadcaster, RAI.

Path to power

Son of a Milanese banker, Berlusconi started as a property developer in the 60s. He invested in local TV as a sideline to his property activities.

Acquiring more local stations, Berlusconi was eventually able to create a network rival to state-owned RAI thanks to legislative changes sponsored by leading politician Bettino Craxi.

Deals and deeds

Berlusconi's empire has grown to include three Italian and Spanish TV stations, AC Milan, publishing company Mondadori, newspapers, film production, banking and insurance, and a stake in Endemol. Most has been by acquisition, but also through political influence allowing laws covering media-ownership rules to be ignored or overturned. Every aspect of his life - politics, media, personal - is touched by controversy, from allegations of corruption to mafia links and conflicts of interest - and that's before the sex scandals.

What he says

"Because of my personal history, my professional achievements and my business skills, I am a man nobody can expect to compare himself to," Berlusconi modestly said of himself.

What people say

George W Bush described him as " man of great ideals, principles, a man of vision".

Would you believe it?

His first job was as a crooner on cruise ships.

The year ahead

Having survived everything his opponents have thrown at him (including that small replica of Milan's cathedral), the only thing "Il Cavaliere" has to fear is his own propensity to shoot himself in the foot.

BERNADIN, TOM

Job: Global chairman and CEO

Company: Leo Burnett Worldwide

Age: 56

Killer power fact

Last year the network not only had the world's second most-awarded ad with the London office's "house of cards" for Shelter but it scooped the majority of the global Kellogg business from JWT.

Path to power

He came to prominence as the CEO of Bozell and lead it into its most successful era, which saw the agency scoop a Cannes Grand Prix in 1998 for its Jeep work. He then ran Lowe New York before moving to Leo Burnett in 2005.

Deals and deeds

He was the brains behind the network-wide decision to merge the Leo Burnett and Arc brands in a bid to offer clients an integrated global agency.

What he says

"To me, the business is a constant pressure. There will be pitches, and you have to aggressively participate in those. And I'm looking forward to that."

What people say

Linda Wolf, former chairman and CEO of Leo Burnett, says: "He demonstrates a passion for his business and an understanding of what is needed to ensure our long-term success. What's more, he's embraced equally by agency and clients."

Would you believe it?

In 2002 he completed the David Rockerfeller Fellows Program, which exposes participants to key leaders and issues in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors of New York City.

The year ahead

Bedding in that Kellogg business across the network. Trying desperately to enjoy the task?

BEWKES, JEFFREY

Job: Chairman and CEO

Company: Time Warner

Age: 58

Killer power fact

As the boss of the world's biggest media owner, he's arguably the most powerful man in the industry.

Although his base salary for 2010 will be a meagre $2 million, his total compensation package is likely to exceed $20 million.

Path to power

Bewkes rose though Time Warner's cable company and acclaimed programming division HBO, where he became chairman and the CEO of HBO in 1995. He was chairman of Time Warner's entertainment and networks group from 2002 to 2005. He served as Time Warner's president and chief operating officer from 2005 to 2007 before taking the top job.

Deals and deeds

The emphasis lately has been more on older media - notably speculation in March 2010 that Time Warner is considering a bid for the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio.

What he says

"When I was very young, I told my parents that I wanted to be in the entertainment industry. That's when they sat me down and broke it to me that we were not Jewish."

What people say

"Is Time Warner going to sell its magazine division? A lot of people think so, but Jeffrey Bewkes says otherwise" - editorial on AOL's Daily Finance site.

Would you believe it?

At HBO in the 90s Bewkes sanctioned a daring programming strategy that led to the creation of now legendary shows like Sex And The City.

The year ahead

Bewkes has overseen a remodelling of the corporation but there's still much to be done. Speculation suggests he may sell underperforming units, such as the Time Inc magazine division or AOL.

BOGLE, NIGEL; SHERWOOD, SIMON

Jobs: Group chairman/group CEO

Company: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Ages: 63 and 54

Killer power fact

Founder Bogle and long-time consigliere Sherwood are the key suit double act behind BBH's organic transformation from UK hotshop into seven-location micro network.

Path to power

Failed lawyer turned account man, Bogle's relentless drive for perfection is a cornerstone of the agency's drive to reinvent and refresh itself. Sherwood has risen with the agency, moving to Singapore in 1996 to open its first international office.

Deals and deeds

As much as his co-founders, Bogle has fiercely protected the agency's independence, yet it was his role in selling a 49 per cent stake in 1997 to his alma mater Leo Burnett (now a Publicis unit) that has powered his vision of a modern ad network.

What they say

Bogle says he has a "highly developed fear of failure, which is a lot of what drives BBH" and also "I'm very shy and that's not necessarily a great thing to be in advertising". Sherwood is fiercely critical of many agencies which, he says, "are run on the fear of losing clients".

What people say

Bogle's seen as the driver to new and greater things. Sherwood has been called the silent S in BBH.

Would you believe it?

Legend has it Bogle insisted his pay was deducted when he left the office an hour earlier one day a week. Sherwood was once rewarded for not joining in a breakaway - with a Porsche 911.

The year ahead

The main task is to get the London office firing on all cylinders again and bed down the one-year-old Mumbai operation.

BOGUSKY, ALEX

Job: Chief creative insurgent

Company: MDC Partners

Age: 47

Killer power fact

Hard to pick just one. Under Bogusky's direction, Crispin Porter & Bogusky has become one of the world's most-awarded agencies and is the only agency to have won the Cannes Grand Prix in all five categories: Promotion, Media, Cyber, Titanium and Film. Creative coups include the US launch of the Mini Cooper, Burger King's "the king" campaign, and making Microsoft, well, if not exactly cool, then semi-cool.

Path to power

Born to designer parents, Bogusky joined Crispin and Porter Advertising as an art director in 1989. Five years later, he became creative director, then partner, and then co-chairman.

Deals and deeds

He passed the creative reins at Crispin to triumvirate Andrew Keller, Rob Reilly and Jeff Benjamin. It seems to be working; by the end of 2009, the agency won a ton of new business and was proclaimed Agency of the Decade by Advertising Age.

What he says

"Life is a pyramid scheme."

What people say

"For nearly a decade, the unhip have flocked to Bogusky in the hope that a little of his mystique might rub off. There is no more adept a mechanic of cool, and Bogusky can give it - and take it away," Fast Company magazine commented.

Would you believe it?

In 2009 he co-authored two books, the The 9-Inch "Diet" (yes, a diet book), with Chuck Porter, and Baked In, a marketing book, with John Winsor.

The year ahead

Having ascended into the hierarchy at MDC, Bogusky's task is to sprinkle his creative fairy dust over the holding company's 32 agencies, ranging from Kirshenbaum & Bond to Vitro Robinson and Mono.

BRAZIER, PAUL

Job: Executive creative director

Company: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO, London

Age: 48

Killer power fact

Multi-awarded Brazier is only the third person in its 33-year history to hold the executive creative director role at the UK's biggest agency for 14 years.

Path to power

Armed with a BA in graphic design from Wolverhampton, Brazier spent the past 16 years at Abbott Mead Vickers after stints at WCRS and Cogents. He was made the executive creative director in 2005.

Deals and deeds

In September last year he was appointed as the D&AD president.

What he says

"There is definitely a lot of pressure in the role, but I think it's like vertigo. If you look down, you realise it's a bloody long way to fall. You have to be dedicated and keep going upwards."

What people say

Tony Davidson, the creative director of Wieden & Kennedy, says: "Brazier might be one of the quieter guys of advertising, but he produces consistently great work and cares massively about it."

Would you believe it?

Brazier played football for Birmingham City before moving into advertising.

The year ahead

The creative product isn't to AMV's high standards at the moment so he'll be working hard to make sure this year sees it back on the awards trail.

BRIEN, NICK

Job: CEO

Company: McCann Worldgroup

Age: 48

Killer power fact

Brien started out as a media buyer, and that makes him the first man to run one of the world's biggest advertising networks who made his name in media. Brien's also one of the few Brits to make it to the top of a resolutely American network.

Path to power

Brien rose from media to become the CEO at Leo Burnett London before moving to the US to work at Starcom, Arc and Universal McCann. He took over the top job at McCann Erickson this spring.

Deals and deeds

Back in the late 80s Brien launched BBJ Media with Jerry Buhlmann, now the CEO of Aegis plc (see p15). After joining Universal McCann in 2005, Brien saw the opportunities to be had from bringing Interpublic Group's two media networks into closer alignment and in 2007 he was given the task of managing both of IPG's media networks, Universal and Initiative, under the Mediabrands umbrella.

What he says

Good management is about "bold decisions, making bets and taking calculated risks".

What people say

John Dooner, the outgoing CEO of McCann Worldgroup, says: "Nick has a vision of where our industry is going and how to position agencies to be ahead of these changes."

Would you believe it?

Brien is often described as an internationalist. He's certainly keen to qualify his British roots: "I am a truly global citizen, with a strong Australian and German background."

The year ahead

Brien will need to bring some clarity to the sprawling and ill-defined McCann Worldgroup. But his first priority must be new business; the company has lost a series of high-profile clients, including a chunk of its Microsoft business. Could Brien be the man to reunite McCann with its media sibling Universal?

BROWN, TINA

Job: Co-founder

Company: The Daily Beast

Age: 56

Killer power fact

Backed by media mogul Barry Diller, magazine makeover and zeitgeist queen Brown is leading a transition few believe possible: taking the sensibilities of celebrity/culture-obsessed glossy titles such as Vanity Fair and The New Yorker and putting them online.

Path to power

Having made her mark in the relatively still waters of British magazines, Brown moved to New York in 1983 with husband Harold Evans (former editor of The Sunday Times) as one half of a media power couple. After reinvigorating Vanity Fair, she controversially edited The New Yorker until 1998, then teamed up with Miramax entrepreneurs the Weinstein brothers to launch the ill-fated Talk magazine and books project. That closed in 2001, after which Brown wrote a biography of the late Princess Diana.

Deals and deeds

Brown's core skill is to mash up the intertwining worlds of politics, money, media and popular culture, and it's notable that she has teamed up with high-profile entrepreneurs at both Talk and The Daily Beast.

What she says

On arriving in New York in 1983, Brown said: "You don't make friends, you make contacts." On The Daily Beast: "(It) doesn't aggregate. It sifts, sorts, curates."

What people say

Brown has been described as a "perfectionist", a "vulgarian" and the mistress of "sassy, blonde, power prose".

Would you believe it?

The Daily Beast shares its name with the fictional newspaper in Scoop, Evelyn Waugh's legendary novel about journalism.

The year ahead

The Daily Beast's confident start obscures the view of some that it has no real unique selling point and little chance of making money any time soon. All depends on the patience of her backer.

BRULE, TYLER

Job: Chairman and editor-in-chief, Monocle

Company: Monocle

Age: 41

Killer power fact

Monocle is both an unashamed love affair with old-fashioned print, or what Brule himself might call "slow media", and a pointer to the way forward for beleaguered print publishers. Monocle's business model includes a high cover price, expensive foreign bureaus, a paywall-protected site, and pop-up Monocle shops selling high-margin goods.

Path to power

Brule shot to immediate fame with the launch of style/designer-chic title Wallpaper* in 1996, a title he devised and edited himself after recovering from being shot in Afghanistan. A success from day one, he sold a stake in it to Time Warner at the height of the media boom in 1997.

Deals and deeds

Cashing in on his status as the high priest of style (and armed with Time Warner cash), Brule also launched a creative agency called Wink, before leaving corporate life and returning to his first love, magazines, with the launch of Monocle in 2007.

What he says

On social media: "Throwing great parties where readers meet; that's what social media is to us."

What people say

He's described as the "sultan of swank".

Would you believe it?

His first name is Jayson and his father is a former Canadian footballer Paul Brule - who doesn't use any accents on his surname. Brule's brand-obsessed lifestyle is brilliantly satirised on a blog, www.beingtylerBrule.com.

The year ahead

Having found a niche for its counter-intuitive business model, Brule's mini media empire should go from strength to strength.

BRYMER, CHUCK

Job: President and CEO

Company: DDB Worldwide

Age: 50

Killer power fact

Brymer has been top dog since 2006 at one of the leading creative networks in the world. He has a powerful patron in John Wren, the chief at Omnicom, and has even been talked of as his potential successor. He's also a pivotal figure in moving DDB on from just advertising.

Path to power

Brymer was plucked from relative obscurity by Wren, who had noted his success at building Interbrand into a network of 30 offices servicing blue-chip clients such as AT&T, British Airways and Samsung. Pairing Brymer with a seasoned creative executive - Bob Scarpelli, a DDB veteran - was a smart move.

Deals and deeds

Brymer has been using the DDB platform from which to promote his theories about so called "swarm marketing". He's even written a book about the way consumers no longer behave like "herds" but like flocks of birds, playing close attention to each other and moving together.

What he says

"We need to make a major change in the way we look at the consumer audience. You can make them aware, but then you have to make them care. Be a consumerist. Live it, breathe it and eat it."

What people say

"There's not a place on the planet where he's not comfortable working with very senior clients" - John Wren, the Omnicom chief.

Would you believe it?

When Wren picked Brymer to take global command of DDB, his profile was so low that one DDB senior manager says he had to Google Brymer to find out who he was.

The year ahead

Brymer's continuing challenge is to build on DDB's acknowledged creative potency by further developing its non-advertising credentials.

BUCKLEY, BRYAN

Job: Co-founder, director

Company: Hungry Man

Age: 47

Killer power fact

Buckley, known for his irreverence, is one of the most awarded, prolific and sought-after directors in America. He has shot more than 40 spots for America's annual ad orgy, the Super Bowl. The most memorable include Budweiser, Monster.com, FedEx, CareerBuilder, E*Trade and Go Daddy.

Recent highlights include the launch of Microsoft's Bing.com and Windows 7, and American Express' "airport lounge" starring Martin Scorsese and Tina Fey.

Path to power

Formerly with Jon Kamen's @radical Media, in 1997 Buckley teamed up with Hank Perlman and Steve Orent to found Hungry Man. The company burst on to the scene with ESPN's "this is SportsCenter" campaign with then-partner Ty Montague.

Deals and deeds

Launched Hungry Man TV, an online entertainment channel featuring original web series, branded entertainment, and custom-made content created by various award-winning filmmakers.

What he says

About his biggest gamble: "On Microsoft, the challenge was dealing with a brand that isn't the hip, cool brand, especially in our industry. I love the underdog factor."

What people say

"Buckley has honed his comedic touch to a fine point and earned himself a reputation as a director who can coax comedy gold from celebrities," Boards magazine says.

Would you believe it?

In 2010 he confounded admirers by directing a Super Bowl spot starring spendthrifts MC Hammer and Ed McMann for a Cash-4Gold.com spot in which they urged cash-strapped viewers to hawk their jewels. It could have been tacky but it wasn't.

The year ahead

Will be all about maintaining his star ranking in an increasingly competitive industry becoming dominated by younger players.

BUHLMANN, JERRY

Job: CEO

Company: Aegis plc and Aegis Media

Age: 50

Killer power fact

Buhlmann is unique in media in running both a plc and the media holding company within it. So he will be a key player should Aegis find itself a takeover target or go on the acquisition trail itself again.

Path to power

Buhlmann has clawed his way up the Aegis management tree in a 13-year career with the group he joined when it acquired BBJ, the UK media agency he co-founded.

Deals and deeds

Aegis Media's strength in digital via its Isobar network can be largely credited to Buhlmann. His passion for growth in the Far East recently saw Carat, the third-largest media agency in China, take an 18 per cent stake in Charm Communications, a leading TV agency in China.

What he says

Buhlmann says: "There is a clear strategy for us to operate as an independent - we have had a long and successful past and we'll have a long and successful future."

What people say

Jed Glanvill, the CEO of Mindshare and a former colleague of Buhlmann, told Campaign: "He is misunderstood because some people see him as ruthless, but, while he doesn't suffer fools, he's incredibly loyal to the people he likes."

Would you believe it?

A collector of fine wines, Buhlmann has found time to renovate outbuildings at his Surrey home into a wine cellar.

The year ahead

Aegis' media strategy is unlikely to change significantly, with a focus on growth in Asia taking priority as it looks to build the strength it has in Europe in other parts of the world. Building digital revenues is also likely to remain a priority.

BURGGRAEVE, CHRIS

Job: Chief marketing officer

Company: Anheuser-Busch InBev

Age: 46

Killer power fact

Burggraeve controls the multi-billion marketing machine behind the world's biggest brewer - the producer of Budweiser, Bud Light and Stella Artois. He's also president of the World Federation of Advertisers.

Path to power

Belgian citizen Burggraeve joined InBev in 2007 after 12 years at Coca-Cola, where he was European group marketing director. Before that he held brand management positions at Procter & Gamble. Burrgraeve's InBev role mushroomed in 2008 when the Belgian-Brazilian giant bought its rival A-B for £36 billion.

Deals and deeds

InBev is famed for its cost-cutting culture, but Burrgraeve promised not to fleece A-B's marketing operation or its US spend of $1.5 billion when the companies merged. Yet 2010 has seen an overhaul of A-B InBev's US marketing operation, with inevitable layoffs. A-B's agency retainers were replaced with project fees, and the roster trimmed.

What he says

"This is American Idol meets Survivor meets football," Burggraeve said about Bud House, a web-based reality show timed for the 2010 World Cup.

What people say

Burrgraeve is unlikely to ever use management consultants after the unsuccessful involvement of the Cambridge Group in Bud Light's marketing strategy from 2006. It was "an enormous, expensive process" that "really derailed" the brand, one former A-B agency executive said.

Would you believe it?

Budweiser is the official beer of the World Cup but unfortunately has no breweries in South Africa.

The year ahead

Maximising Budweiser's World Cup sponsorship, dealing with competition from MillerCoors and more cost-cutting to help

A-B InBev cope with its $52 billion debt.

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