Government launches independent review of BBC's governance and regulation

The government has launched an independent review of the BBC looking into how the broadcaster is governed and regulated.

John Whittingdale: the secretary of state for culture, media and sport
John Whittingdale: the secretary of state for culture, media and sport

It will form part of ongoing scrutiny of the BBC’s Royal Charter, which expires next year and is reviewed every 10 years.

Sir David Clementi, the former chairman at Virgin Money and Prudential, will lead the independent review. He has also been the deputy governor at the Bank of England.

He has been asked to give his suggestions on the model and "specific mechanisms" of governance and regulation at the broadcaster.

His review will also look at how the BBC, including the BBC Executive, the BBC Trust and Ofcom, the bodies that govern and regulate the broadcaster, engage with licence fee payers and the industry.

The government kicked off a wholesale review of the broadcaster in July when it released a public consultation on the BBC’s funding and scope of activity.

Clementi’s report will be available in early 2016.

John Whittingdale, the secretary of state for culture, media and sport, said: "Television is of huge importance to the nation and the BBC lies at the heart of British television.

"However no-one could deny that the BBC has made some bad mistakes in the last few years. Savile, McAlpine, Ross-Brand, severance payments and excessive salaries have all contributed to a widespread view that the governance structure needs reform."

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.


Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

1 How Sainsbury's ads revolutionised the UK's food culture

Abbott Mead Vickers' press ads for Sainsbury's in the 1980s formed the most influential and culturally significant campaign the UK has ever produced, argues Paul Burke.

Just published