Govt to crack down on fly-posting operations

A crackdown on the #3.5 million-a-year fly-posting industry has been proposed in a report commissioned by the Government.

A crackdown on the #3.5 million-a-year fly-posting industry has

been proposed in a report commissioned by the Government.



John Prescott, the secretary of state for the environment, transport and

regions, is considering new laws which would allow local councils to

take out ’blanket injunctions’ against fly posters and recover the cost

of removing posters from them.



Local authorities may also be encouraged to set up ’legal’ fly-posting

sites.



A study by the consultancy, Arup Economics and Planning, found that fly

posting has grown into a well-organised business which is used by ad

agencies even though it is illegal. They described it as a

cost-effective, high-impact medium whose ’slightly anarchic edge’

appeals to its target youth audience and can give a staid product a new,

alternative image.



’The legal status of fly posting and the powers to control it are

regarded by advertising agencies as ’conveniently vague’, with the

apparent ambiguities and loopholes in current legislation justifying the

use of fly posting,’ the report said. ’From the advertising industry

perspective, there appears to be limited concern about the illegality of

fly-posting or the deterrent effect of fines if successfully

prosecuted.’



The recent move into fly posting by companies that usually use more

mainstream marketing, such as poster hoardings, has resulted in

tit-for-tat retaliation by fly posters, who then plaster hoardings with

their own advertisements.



However, the outdoor industry believes fly posting damages the

environment and prejudices planning authorities against legitimate

outdoor media.



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