Happy jumper and friendly lemon extol BA

British Airways has released three TV ads selling its product benefits with slow motion close-ups and voiceovers describing a "friendly lemon", a "happy jumper" and a "relaxed trainer".

The ads, created by Bartle Bogle Hegarty (BBH), each use a single shot to focus on a lemon floating in a gin and tonic, a jumper falling in slow-motion into a suitcase, and a trainer lying underneath someone’s flight seat.

Each execution features a different pop song, from Baccara's 'Yes sir, I can boogie' to The Gunter Kallmann Chor's 'Daydream', while a voiceover explains how the different objects demonstrate the services available on BA flights, such as complimentary drinks and no baggage fees.

The ads aim to distance the carrier from no-frills airlines such as easyJet and Ryanair, and reinforce its "To fly, to serve" message.

BBH strategy director Ross Berthinussen and team director Mark Whiteside worked with creative directors Justin Moore and Hamish Pinnell on the ad.

The agency’s TV producers Natalie Parish and Michelle Kendrick also worked on the campaign, with strategic business lead Kier Mather. Rattling Stick was the production company involved, with director Sara Dulop and producer Stuart Bentham.

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Omnicom shuts M2M in UK after account losses
Share

1 Omnicom shuts M2M in UK after account losses

Omnicom has shut its media agency M2M in the UK following a string of account losses and Alistair MacCullum, the chief executive of M2M, is stepping down.

Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats
Shares0
Share

1 Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats

Forging an emotional tie with consumers is one of the strongest ways to protect your brand. Products can be copycatted, but the distinctive identity of a true brand can never be replicated argues Nir Wegrzyn, CEO of BrandOpus.

Just published