High flyers targeted in Star Alliance's Terminal 2 campaign

Star Alliance, the global airline network, has partnered with Heathrow Terminal 2 in an effort to drive engagement with high value international travellers.

The social media and digital display campaign was planned and bought by media agency MEC, with film and images made by Atomic London, Star Alliance’s creative agency.

The films will try to bring the Terminal 2 experience to life, looking at how business travellers spend their time before they fly, including fine dining, shopping and relaxing in the lounges.

Mark Davies, the director of loyalty and marketing for Star Alliance, said: "We are thrilled to launch this, our second Heathrow campaign, this time with a new communications approach for Star Alliance.

"The MEC team showed that they clearly understood our objectives, engaging with our core target audience of high value international travellers in a very targeted and impactful manner."

MEC will also support Star Alliance’s social media team by using Twitter to target key influencers in business travel who use the terminal and encourage them to share their travel experiences online.

A second phase of activity will see user generated content being used in social advertising.

Peter Colvin, ‎the group account director at MEC Global Solutions, said: "This campaign embraces a powerful blend of targeted programmatic buying and re-targeting to leverage a social activation that drives high value international travellers to their social hub."

Creative team Matt Lee and Brian Riley at Atomic London worked on the campaign.

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