Ikea ad drafts in Tattoo Man

Ikea is confronting criticism about its customer service in a new campaign by St Luke’s.

Ikea is confronting criticism about its customer service in a new

campaign by St Luke’s.



Three 50-second television ads introduce a new character - the Tattoo

Man, an evangelical Swedish store assistant who explains and defends

Ikea’s policy of self-service, self-assembly and self-transportation to

his colleagues.



The first ad shows him stripping to reveal a body covered with strange

tattoos. He uses them to explain how removing unnecessary levels of

service saves customers money.



The second ad, ’long wait’, explains that Ikea’s policy of keeping

furniture in stock may mean 15-minute queues but is better than waiting

days for delivery from other stores.



’Sweat’ addresses the cost savings made on selling self-assembly

furniture.



Alan Young, the creative director at St Luke’s who wrote the campaign

with the art director Julian Vizard, said: ’Consumers are so used to

watered-down service that they’ve forgotten it comes at a price. The

campaign reminds them that stripping out unnecessary service levels can

provide a better deal.’



Frances Evans, the advertising manager at Ikea, said: ’Customers need to

know that shopping at Ikea will never be the same as shopping at other

stores.’



The ads were directed by Rocky Morton through Partizan Midi Minuit.



Media is by MediaCom TMB. St Luke’s has also designed a website,

www.tattooman.co.uk.