INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MEDIA: ME AND MY BUSINESS MEDIA

Simon Lloyd

Simon Lloyd



Chairman



Optimedia



Yes, it’s completely true. We’re all consuming so much more media these

days, if ’consuming’ is the right description, of course.Take Campaign

for example. I used to read it cover to cover. But today, while I still

read all the key news pages, there are others I have to skip over,

because different forms of media are demanding my attention.



Is it because we all have insatiable appetites? In my case, no. I read

largely because I need to.



What international business media do I choose? I read the Financial

Times and the Economist religiously and thoroughly. The Economist is

excellent on worldwide business matters and has strong opinions with

which I tend to agree.



Then I flick through most issues of Time, Newsweek and the Wall Street

Journal, sometimes Forbes and Business Week. Forbes’ new global magazine

is more likely to be relevant and it’s thinner, which means it’s also

more likely to get read.



As for my TV viewing, I must be the only adman not to have cable at

home, so my exposure to BBC World, Sky News, CNBC and Bloomberg is only

in office hours or hotel bedrooms. For specific business news, CNBC is

the best, and for balanced international coverage I’d choose to watch

BBC World.



CNN International falls somewhere between the two. For light relief from

news programmes, I watch Fawlty Towers.



Inflight news or a good drama are a must on long-haul flights, but

inflight magazines I can happily leave alone.



(At home my TV viewing is almost entirely restricted to news and, on the

weekends, a bit of light relief, which means Fawlty Towers, Sunday night

drama and the like.)



In-flight news and movies are a must on long-haul flights, but in-flight

magazines I can happily leave alone.



Liz Workman



Executive regional media director Leo Burnett



My media consumption tends to be fairly eclectic as so many titles hit

my desk.



Daily intake, however, begins with the Today programme and then usually

incorporates a UK broadsheet - the Guardian on Monday, the Times on

Wednesday and, increasingly, the Independent on other days. I spend no

more than ten minutes looking at the main stories and leaders, unless

I’m travelling, in which case I revel in more features. The Wall Street

Journal is a must-read. It has the best media coverage and a good spin

on the industry.



Plus its anachronistic form continues to astound.



I spend 20 minutes each week with the Economist (they say all us media

folk claim this one!), although I seldom read as many leaders as I’d

like, because I tend to get waylaid by the fascinating news items on

Latin American dictators. A weakness, I know, but having spent time in

Mexico, I can’t resist. Another hangover from Latin America is Newsweek,

which is a good compendium of international news.



As for cyber activity, my surfing is driven mostly by specific

requirements for information, such as company sites and holidays, but I

like Epicurious - a Conde Nast site, and other foodie sites such as

Fodor’s and Zagat’s.



I practically never watch television, although if I’m travelling I watch

some CNN International (but I still cannot understand why they insist on

using American anchors on the European feeds, so I can’t stay tuned for

very long without zapping), CNBC for the Media programme (Tuesdays) and

Sky News for its dumbed-down and UK-specific stuff. At home I watch

wildlife programmes (as long as there’s no violence) and Friends.



Charles Courtier



Managing director



Y&R Media Europe



I’m not a dedicated consumer of international media, nor business media

per se. However, I do dip in and out of it as the mood takes me,

especially when I’m travelling.



In a hotel room I’ll surf through all the international TV channels such

as CNN International, Eurosport, MTV and CNBC, and I’ll stop and watch

if something catches my attention.



CNN International comes into its own during something like the Monica

Lewinsky affair. You get the ability to be updated instantly and in

graphic detail. No-one does an American scandal quite like CNN

International.



In terms of reading, the only international business or media title that

I’m dedicated to is the Economist.



But in the end, I’d rather be with Q for the music, What Hi-Fi for the

gear and Decanter for the wine.



Steve Pollack



Managing partner MindShare Europe



I always scan the Wall Street Journal Europe in the office. Its coverage

of the EU is first-rate, as is its coverage of European and US marketing

and media stories. It gets my vote over the International Herald

Tribune.



The European is just a business-lounge read for me. I like its current

incarnation, but there just isn’t enough time to read everything unless

I’m travelling. The Financial Times only gets looked at for obscure

exchange rates.



I spend a lot of time in airports, aircraft and hotels. I can’t sleep on

planes, so I always travel loaded down with magazines. Top of my list is

the Economist, which I read whether I’m travelling or not. It has such a

broad coverage of world events, written with a wonderfully subtle

humour.



My one criticism is that I invariably get halfway through an article

thinking ’I believe this’, and then they finish the story with an

equally well argued opposite view.



Time, Fortune, Newsweek and Forbes can’t hide their American roots,

which puts me off reading them regularly. However, Time and Newsweek are

the best of the bunch for inflight reading.



As for TV, when travelling I channel hop between CNN International, BBC

World and Sky News. The saddest day this year was when NBC Europe

stopped broadcasting, depriving me of late nights in hotel rooms with

Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien.



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