IPC gives up on Eva after relaunch fails to boost circulation

IPC Magazines has finally abandoned its young women’s title, Eva, after a radical revamp in March failed to halt flagging sales.

IPC Magazines has finally abandoned its young women’s title, Eva,

after a radical revamp in March failed to halt flagging sales.



Eva, launched by IPC in 1994, has had a difficult ride in the highly

competitive women’s weeklies market. In July 1996, the magazine cut its

cover price and relaunched as a news-led magazine.



Earlier this year, however, IPC changed tactics and moved the title away

from its broad target audience of 24- to 44-year-olds to focus on the

18- to 24-year-old age group. IPC hoped to bridge a gap it believed

existed between teen titles and the young women’s market



But the drastic change in focus failed to raise circulation, with the

last round of ABC figures revealing a drop of just over 29 per cent year

on year and period on period to 152,800. The last issue will appear on

25 November.



Linda Lancaster-Gaye, the managing director of IPC’s women’s weeklies

group, commented: ’We were aiming to attract young women more familiar

with monthlies and introduce them to a weekly frequency magazine with a

sassy, sexy editorial mix. Unfortunately, the sales base didn’t prove

sufficiently large enough.’



In May, IPC carried out its first spring clean following its management

buyout backed by Cinven at the end of last year. It closed Vox from its

music portfolio, axed GMTV magazine, a joint venture with the contract

publisher, the Publishing Team, and sold the football title, Goal, to

Haymarket Publishing.



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