Liverpool FC to stream next match in 360-degree video

Liverpool Football Club will screen a live football match tonight with a 360-degree view on YouTube, as top Premier League teams continue to build their online brands for a global audience.

The 18-time league champions will stream its friendly with Huddersfield Town on the social video giant using a 360-degree camera – described by Liverpool as a first for a Premier League team.

Viewers will be able to control the view of the camera from the halfway line and look around the field of view or behind at the fans. Last year French team Lille demonstrated one of its football matches in 360-degrees (above), as well as views from inside the players' changing room before the game.

The stream will be accompanied by live commentary from LFCTV, the club’s TV station which is normally only available on pay-TV providers.

It is the latest example of top-level English football teams expanding the ways fans can engage online as the global appeal of the competition continues to strengthen.

Global popularity for the Premier League is reflected in the huge fees paid by UK broadcasters Sky and BT Sport for exclusive coverage of matches. The latest broadcast rights for 2016-19 reached a record £5.14bn.

Last month, Manchester City became the first Premier League club to launch a bot on Facebook Messenger, feeding news to fans around the world.

A Liverpool FC spokesman said: "Being able to view the match in full 360° will give our fans from all around the world the closest feeling to being there in the stands cheering on the team."


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