Lord Neill pursues regulation of political ads

A new code of practice for party political advertising is expected after the Government’s anti-sleaze watchdog backed the ad industry’s call for change.

A new code of practice for party political advertising is expected

after the Government’s anti-sleaze watchdog backed the ad industry’s

call for change.



Lord Neill, chairman of the Committee on Standards in Public Life,

recommended in his report on political funding on Tuesday that the

parties and the industry should agree a new code for press and poster

campaigns.



His call represents a victory over the politicians by the Committee of

Advertising Practice. It told the Neill inquiry that the present system

was under strain because the parties are exempt from some parts of the

industry’s code, and do not have to prove their claims like other

advertisers.



Replying to CAP’s call, the Neill committee said: ’We would welcome any

progress which could be made in this direction by the political parties

working in association with the advertising industry, and we would

exhort them to endeavour to formulate an agreed code.’



However, the negotiations may prove tricky because the parties are

split. Labour wants political campaigns brought fully under the

industry’s code but the Tories back the present ’halfway house’

system.



As expected, Lord Neill’s report signalled cuts in the ad budgets at

future general elections by proposing a pounds 20 million ceiling for

each party’s spending in the campaign. Both Labour and the Tories

believe they will spend less on press and poster advertising in order to

protect their budgets.



Neill provided some comfort for Labour by supporting its fight against

the BBC and ITC’s plans to end party political broadcasts in

non-election periods.



Neill’s report on political funding made 100 recom-mendations, most of

which concentrated on sweeping changes to the way parties receive

money.



It called for full public disclosure of donations to political parties

over a certain sum, as well as an end to blind trusts and all foreign

donations by non-citizens.



It also recommended a ban on anonymous donations of pounds 50 or more,

and suggested establishing an independent and impartial election

commission to monitor the new regulations.



Topics

Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).