Lynx shifts focus to multi-dimensional modern men

Social video experts at Be On review "Men in progress", the latest viral from Lynx.

"Lynx is an example of a brand that isn't afraid to take a risk by representing reality with multi-dimensional modern men."


9/10

Lynx is known for its award-winning marketing campaigns and for being a brand that prides itself on being a part of the British guy's psyche. It's therefore fitting that its campaigns should reflect the modern man.

Cue "Men In progress – boys don't cry", a two and a half minute spot that delves into what makes men cry, and the taboos around men demonstrating emotion.

The film forms part of a wider nine-month digital campaign by TMW Unlimited called "Men in progress".

Each of the videos feature real men talking about topics including their sexuality, how it feels to be a father, and the pressures of looking "masculine".

Shot in a black and white interview format, the spots work hard to elicit responses from the participants and the viewer. While some people may view crying as a sign of weakness, the video challenges this notion and encourages men to lead by example.

Male suicide is a topic high on the news agenda, and is the biggest killer of men under the age of 45, according to Calm, the charity that works to prevent male suicide. And it's not just brands taking an active role in highlighting this issue. Publisher The Huffington Post UK echoes a similar message with its "Boys do cry" campaign featuring musicians Twin Atlantic, Rizzle Kicks, The Vamps and Busted.

Lynx's focus on the modern man is markedly different to its competitor brands. For example, Old Spice takes an irreverent and farcical approach to its advertising compared to Gillette, which opts for a more serious representation of its target audience.

Lynx is an example of a brand that isn't afraid to take a risk by representing reality with multi-dimensional modern men.

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