Magazine ABCs: Men's Health leads the pack but top three see circulation shrink

Men's Health retained its ranking as the biggest selling men's magazine, with Forever Sports, published by Haymarket for Sports Direct, beating GQ to the second spot, the latest data from the Audit Bureau of Circulation Shows.

Magazine ABCs: Men's Health leads the pack but top three see circulation shrink

Men’s Health, published by Hearst-Rodale, had 119,530 actively purchased copies across its print and digital editions in the first six months of 2016. The magazine’s total circulation of 180,082, meanwhile, was down 7.5% on the previous period.

Overall, the men's lifestyle magazines sector's combined circulation total grew 22% to 1.69 million

Condé Nast’s GQ was second on total circulation, on 117,039 (down 2.5% on last period), followed by Forever Sports on 101,430 (down 3.4%). But on paid copies, Forever Sports was ahead, with 80,509 to GQ’s 73,668.

The next biggest sellers were considerably behind: Esquire, from Hearst, on 30,981, and Wired (Condé Nast) with 30,153. 

Esquire was the only one of the top five paid titles to see significant growth, with total circulation up 10.3% on last period and 14.5% year on year, while Wired’s circulation was flat.

Based on total circulation, however, the paid magazines were a long way behind the top three free titles. Shortlist, from Shortlist Media, remains the number one men’s magazine, with 505,876 copies – up marginally on the previous period. It was followed by Sport, owned by Wireless Group – now part of News Corp - with 306,384, and Coach, from Dennis Publishing, on 300,997.

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