MEDIA: CANARY: AN EXPERT’S VIEW - Canary may look great but the content offers little of interest, Hugo Drayton says

Another glossy magazine in our overflowing in-trays. At least this comes from the high-maintenance stable of Conde Nast, so slick production and celebrity fawning are promised. While it might have been possible to find a magazine publisher somewhere in the vertical Fleet Street of Canary Wharf, Conde Nast’s credentials in this world are impeccable.

Another glossy magazine in our overflowing in-trays. At least this

comes from the high-maintenance stable of Conde Nast, so slick

production and celebrity fawning are promised. While it might have been

possible to find a magazine publisher somewhere in the vertical Fleet

Street of Canary Wharf, Conde Nast’s credentials in this world are

impeccable.



Indeed, in terms of production and quality, Canary does not

disappoint.



However, I wonder if it adds any extra value to our burgeoning

repertoire of required reading. Given the local abundance of high net

worth individuals (and more importantly the wannabees) in Docklands, its

main role must be as a well-targeted direct mailshot. Although many of

those whom I asked had not seen this latest kid on the block.



We already have The Wharf, a weekly tabloid newspaper that aims to

chronicle the activities affecting our financial and media-savvy

community. Canary is, predictably, its other, designer-clad half. The

format echoes every other lifestyle magazine in town, a cross between

the Evening Standard’s ES magazine and our own Telegraph Magazine, but

with a Vogue-style heavyweight cover .



Of course, I feel slighted at being ignored in the inaugural ’who’s who

in Canary Wharf’ column, but then so was my boss. The article on James

Murdoch was worth reading but I would have liked more insight into one

of our more illustrious neighbours.



So, Canary serves as an upmarket advertising vehicle for the retail

vultures that prey on our earnings. But beyond that, unless future

editions become more focused on our surroundings, I do not see much

value in Canary.



I assume it is funded by Canary Wharf management and retail advertisers

and so there is not much incentive to be investigative, funny or even

critical.



We are left with a sweet but fleeting taste of glossy PR and a useful

directory for our fast-evolving village. The very existence of such a

magazine underlines the money-making machine that Docklands now

symbolises.



Publisher

Conde Nast Publications with Canary Wharf Group

Full-page colour ad rate

pounds 2,080

Print run

40,000

Cover price

Free

Advertisers include

Vision Express, Ralph Lauren, HMV, Mont Blanc Press



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