MEDIA: MARIE CLAIRE: AN EXPERT’S VIEW. Ten years on, Marie Claire still has style and flair to keep Claire Beale hooked

I can remember the first Marie Claire. I’d just graduated, moved to London, collected my first pay cheque and snogged my first middle-aged man. I’d grown up.

I can remember the first Marie Claire. I’d just graduated, moved to

London, collected my first pay cheque and snogged my first middle-aged

man. I’d grown up.



After three years of English literature, I was ready to rejoin the 80s

and rediscover a world beyond Wuthering Heights. I found it in Marie

Claire.



All of it. A dizzying mix of cultures, lifestyles, attitudes and

opinions, all underpinned by the essentials of being a woman in the late

20th century: fashion, health, beauty - executed with a flair and design

more engaging and colourful than anything I’d seen in the magazines of

my pre-adulthood. I was, I quickly decided, Marie Claire Woman.



Like many women my age, I suspect, I can’t believe ten years have

passed. I’m still reading Marie Claire. Not, perhaps, with the same

reverence or hunger, more with the pleasure of meeting an old friend

whose jokes you’ve heard a hundred times before but who still makes you

smile.



Other titles have come and gone from my reading repertoire, but Marie

Claire remains. I still turn first to 101 Ideas (clothes I can afford),

plan my wardrobe with its fashion pages, lap up the beauty tips and keep

it by my bed until I’ve waded through the reportage.



The serious articles which made Marie Claire different ten years ago can

now look a little limp alongside the meaty pieces I’m used to in Vanity

Fair but, as far as women’s mags are concerned, Marie Claire still has

the edge when it comes to quality reporting.



A glance at the latest ABCs suggests Marie Claire (down 4 per cent year

on year) may not be hitting quite the right note with new recruits, but

I’m one loyal reader who’s definitely celebrating its tenth

anniversary.



Claire Beale is Campaign’s media editor.



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