MEDIA: PS: An Expert’s View - PS’s catalogue look could fail to excite the over-30s market, Deborah Hale says

There’s one thing about being a ’busy, working thirtysomething’, and that is you resist being categorised or targeted as one. Nevertheless, as a self-confessed shopaholic and magazine junkie, I was intrigued to review PS.

There’s one thing about being a ’busy, working thirtysomething’,

and that is you resist being categorised or targeted as one.

Nevertheless, as a self-confessed shopaholic and magazine junkie, I was

intrigued to review PS.



The editorial in the first issue sensibly asks whether the world needs

another women’s magazine, before promising that PS is very different

from the rest of the crowd.



Well, yes and no. PS’s main claim to fame is that it is the ’world’s

first home shopping magazine’. Everything in it - from a lipstick, to a

gadget, to a sofa - can be bought direct. Marvellous!



At first glance PS’s format is similar to other women’s magazines. There

are all the usual features which play directly to the Bridget Jones

Diary syndrome: food, relationships, ’Quick fixes for a fitter future’,

and ’The truth about fat after 30’.



The cover promises fashion, homes, health, beauty, food and travel and

all of these sectors are well represented. The fashion spreads, in

particular, are well put together and web addresses and telephone

hotlines accompany each item, making it easy for the reader to select

and then shop straight off the page.



In terms of the magazine’s format this is a good idea, but you are never

quite sure if you are reading a magazine or a catalogue. The fact is

that it is both. The features are interspersed with ’catalogue’ ads from

a range of popular names, which include Marks & Spencer and Laura

Ashley.



While these do relate to features or fashion spreads, the magazine

doesn’t really flow. The catalogue sections are exactly that and look

flat compared with the rest of the magazine. It seems that the very

thing that makes PS different is the thing that lets it down. The

magazine appears a bit uncomfortable with its own format.



Nevertheless, it does provide a good overview of what’s out there and

shopping direct has that important convenience factor. If PS continues

to showcase an interesting cross-section of retailers and if you are

busy, working and thirtysomething, this could be the magazine for

you.





Frequency: Bi-monthly



Full-page colour ad: pounds 6,800



Publisher: Dennis Publishing Circulation n/a



Cover price: pounds 2



Advertisers include: Toyota, Clairol, Wall’s, American Express, Promise,

Philips, Birds Eye.



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