Media Week 30 under 30: Abi Morrish, MEC

what’s something every media industry person should do before they’re 30?

Have done a major F*** up. So bad you feel nauseous, sweaty and consumed with a sense of impending doom and consequence. You feel useless, like no one should trust you, because you can't even trust yourself. Even making a cup of tea feels like a task that's beyond your capabilities.

But, when the dust has settled, you start to analyse the error and you start to adapt and evolve. You get wise, you get creative in making sure it doesn't happen again, and you start to test and relearn how to trust yourself again on new and improved terms. The light bulb ends up brighter than it was before.

However, you live and work with that modicum of fear from that mistake forever, it's always present, making you more alert, more rigorous and ultimately more confident.

Embrace and own your under 30 major f*** up.

If you could only take one thing to a desert island, what would you choose and why?

Though my sister might not be too happy, I'd take my two-year-old niece. She's all the perspective and levelling I need in my life encapsulated in a two year olds body.

As you ascend the career ladder, it's important in one area of your life to be the one that's not in control. In our relationship my niece is the CEO and I'm the eager to please intern. That's if the CEO had an obsession with cuddly toy tea parties.

Perspective is incredibly hard to find so when you have it you don't relinquish it, not even for a second.

Plus, she's small enough to be able to do much more hunting and gathering of necessary food supplies....



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