Middle market titles secure bigger share of business readers

Broadsheet newspapers and specialist business magazines are losing business readers to mid-market titles such as the Daily Mail and The Mail on Sunday.

Broadsheet newspapers and specialist business magazines are losing

business readers to mid-market titles such as the Daily Mail and The

Mail on Sunday.



The latest British Business Survey produced by Ipsos-RSL shows that

specialist titles such as Management Today, The Economist and Director

have either lost readers or only added a relatively small number.



The survey, which is conducted every two years among more than 3,000

senior and middle managers, shows that Management Today’s readership

among AB business people fell from 98,000 in 1997 to 88,000 in 2000,

while The Economist and Director added only 1,000 new readers each.



The Daily Telegraph lost business readers during the period, down 8.9

per cent from 214,000 in 1997 to 195,000 in 2000; while The Observer was

down 11.5 per cent from 104,000 to 92,000 readers. The Independent and

The Independent on Sunday were also down by 1.2 per cent and 5.6 per

cent respectively.



Broadsheets that added readers included The Times, up by 6.9 per cent,

and the Financial Times, which was up 9.9 per cent.



Associated Newspapers increased its share of the business audience by

almost 30 per cent. The Daily Mail grew from 200,000 in 1997 to 259,000,

up 29.5 per cent, while The Mail on Sunday was up 28.8 per cent to

335,000 business readers.



Mike Ironside, the managing director of The Mail on Sunday, said: ’The

figures reflect the upweighting of financial coverage in both titles. We

are confident that the next research will show even bigger growth.’



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