Morrisons positions itself as low-priced supermarket with 'love it cheaper' strategy

Morrison's has today revealed a new positioning that shows the supermarket as a lower-priced retailer as it seeks to take back market share from the likes of Lidl and Aldi.

Morrisons: unveils campaign to promote the supermarket as la ower-priced retailer
Morrisons: unveils campaign to promote the supermarket as la ower-priced retailer

The brand positioning, "I'm you're new cheaper Morrisons", will feature the retailer cutting the cost of more than 1,200 items in-store and online.

A supporting campaign, created by DLKW Lowe aims to capture the UK's love of food through a series of everyday moments – the way a dog will plead for a piece of sausage, the way someone will pinch the best bit of food off of their partner's plate when they are out of the room; the reams of cling film that will get used to wrap kids' sandwiches.

Each ad shows an everyday food item that is now permanently cheaper at Morrisons, using a "Love 'em cheaper" strapline.

The supermarket is also launching a 'Pricecuts' page as part of its Morrisons.com site, designed to show how much cheaper its food is. It is powered by Mysupermarket.co.uk in order to provide a transparency model for consumers to be able to view the pricing history of an item.

Belinda Youngs, corporate brand marketing director of Morrisons, said: "This ambitious multi-channel marketing campaign clearly announces the significant price cuts we have made on over 1,200 prices that matter most to customer.

"It is the start of a clear brand positioning for Morrisons as a value-led grocer, committed to making good food cheaper".

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