NEW WOMAN: AN EXPERT’S VIEW: Jane Austin chokes on the new-look title’s addition of gutsy, in-yer-face humour

’New Woman, new danger’ screams the media pack to announce the arrival of the magazine’s relaunch. More like ’New Woman, no new surprises’, and a smattering of derivation at that. But the relaunch is a worthy attempt to breathe spice into the life of a 25- to 35-year-old ’gutsy, glamorous working woman with a sense of humour’.

’New Woman, new danger’ screams the media pack to announce the

arrival of the magazine’s relaunch. More like ’New Woman, no new

surprises’, and a smattering of derivation at that. But the relaunch is

a worthy attempt to breathe spice into the life of a 25- to 35-year-old

’gutsy, glamorous working woman with a sense of humour’.



What the publishers have failed to realise, however, is that gutsy ABC1

women with a mean age of 31 don’t give a fig about meeting their

partner’s mum, or why Cameron Diaz has got high cheekbones, a movie

career and Matt Dillon.



Picking up the mag, I went straight to the feature, ’special men confess

about love, sex, cheating and c-c-commitment’, hoping to see an array of

handsome men with huge willies, only to find pages of fat blokes wearing

citrus-coloured shorts and a ’fun’ guide on why men cheat and how to

dampen their desire to press fresh flesh. One solution is to ’put bleach

in his hot cup of coffee. If that doesn’t work, put his genitals in

there.’ Works for me.



Women’s magazines have long needed a sense of humour, especially in

picture captions - but on every page?



For all its ’girls just wanna have fun’ writing and headlines, the

magazine oozes a feel-good factor. The feature ’tick, tick, tick’ about

women who have listened to their biological clocks and had children is

well written. Marketing Week’s ex-editorial assistant is New Woman’s

’love life’ editor. From news stories on relaunching a yoghurt to care

in the community - whatever next?



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