NEWS: BACC allows RACC access to experts

The new radio industry body that is being set up to vet ads has survived a potential crisis which threatened to strangle it at birth.

The new radio industry body that is being set up to vet ads has survived

a potential crisis which threatened to strangle it at birth.



The launch of the Radio Advertising Clearance Centre was thrown into

doubt when the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre, which until now

has been responsible for passing radio scripts, refused to allow the

RACC access to its expert consultants.



However, Uisdean Mac-Lean, the BACC’s head of advertising clearance,

said this week that the matter had been resolved and its consultants

would be able to work for the RACC.



The news comes a week after the BACC said it was reducing its staff by

four through ‘natural wastage’ because some of its work was being taken

over by the RACC. This week’s BACC announcement was accompanied by a

sharp rebuke from MacLean to Philip Circus, legal affairs director of

the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising. Circus had attacked the

BACC’s stance on its experts as ‘sour grapes’ and warned that the

impasse could lead to inconsistent rulings (Campaign, 17 May).



MacLean said talks with the RACC had begun before Circus made his

criticisms, which he claimed were ‘premature and unhelpful’.



He explained: ‘It would have been more constructive if Philip had talked

to the BACC before sounding off.’



MacLean claimed the discussions had taken time ‘because it was a matter

that needed proper consideration. They were our consultants and we have

invested a great deal of time and money in them’.



Circus welcomed the outcome and said he understood why the BACC had held

out. ‘Our members will have to work within a new system and we’ll do our

best to make it work,’ he commented.



Leading figures within the radio industry are enthusiastic about the

RACC, which they see as a sign of the medium’s growing maturity. They

have also expressed concern about the amount of money they pay to the

BACC and are convinced they can do the job cheaper themselves.