NEWS: Berlei switches the emphasis in latest work for sports bra

Berlei has taken last year’s criticism from the Advertising Standards Authority to heart in this summer’s campaign for its new shock absorber sports bra.

Berlei has taken last year’s criticism from the Advertising Standards

Authority to heart in this summer’s campaign for its new shock absorber

sports bra.



Last year, the ASA banned a Berlei poster - which showed a skipping rope

drooping in the manner of two sagging breasts - on the grounds that

there was not enough factual evidence to support its claim that sports

bras can help delay sagging. However, the ASA allowed magazine

advertisements which carried more accompanying text to run.



This summer’s campaign, which was created by Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO,

is aimed at the eight out of ten women who take regular exercise but do

not wear a sports bra. It takes care to explain that unless breasts are

properly supported, regular exercise can stretch chest ligaments,

causing sagging.



The text, which appears alongside a dramatic picture of the Olympic gold

medallist, Sally Gunnell, jogging along a mountain path, goes on to say

that more than 80 per cent of doctors surveyed agreed that wearing a

specialist sports bra helps delay sagging. It adds that the shock

absorber has been proven the best at reducing breast movement caused by

exercise. The headline reads: ‘With the shock absorber sports bra you

can run for years without dropping.’



More than pounds 500,000 has been devoted to the campaign, which was

written by Malcolm Duffy and art directed by Paul Briginshaw.



Photography was by Max Forsythe. It will run in national dailies and

their weekend sections, together with a selection of women’s and

specialist magazines, such as Marie Claire, Health and Fitness, and

Zest. The media was planned and bought by AMV.



Berlei commissioned independent research from Herriot-Watt University,

where research data on a range of sports bras on the market was

analysed. It found that the shock absorber was more effective at

reducing breast movement than its rivals in 75 per cent of all trials.



The data also showed that the shock absorber reduces breast displacement

by about 55 per cent, compared with normal bras which reduce it by only

38 per cent. Even women with A cups, the results concluded, who often

feel they do not need bras at all, are subject to an average of 50 per-

cent less displacement when wearing a shock absorber bra.