NEWS: D&AD flyposters go against ASA guidelines

Flyposted notices, promoting D&AD’s Student Expo, have cast an awkward light on the organisation’s policy of banning flyposters from competing for its own awards.

Flyposted notices, promoting D&AD’s Student Expo, have cast an awkward

light on the organisation’s policy of banning flyposters from competing

for its own awards.



Posters, featuring images of pine-tree car air-fresheners, have appeared

on properties in London to promote next week’s student exhibition.



D&AD’s director, David Kester, claimed to be unaware that any of the

posters had gone up unlawfully. He suggested that it was those mailed

out to colleges that had been going up, implicating students as the

culprits.



‘The posters went out to the 30 colleges involved this year and, as they

were sponsored [by the Guardian], we printed an awful lot,’ he

explained. ‘We don’t have a policy on flyposting. We just go by the

Advertising Standards Authority’s requirements.’



It is only a year ago that D&AD decided to incorporate ASA guidelines,

which prohibit flyposting, into its entry requirements.



Despite being illegal, flyposting regularly features alongside

legitimate campaigns, although the brands involved usually distance

themselves from the practice.



However, some argue that the content is as legitimate as any other.

Michelle Poole, the marketing director of MTV Europe, which has used

flyposting to promote its magazine, Blah Blah Blah, said: ‘There’s so

much visual material on the streets, it’s hard to make people stop.’



Topics