NEWS: Labour and Tories switch to posters

The Conservative and Labour parties are planning to spend the bulk of their ad budgets on poster rather than press campaigns in the run-up to the general election.

The Conservative and Labour parties are planning to spend the bulk of

their ad budgets on poster rather than press campaigns in the run-up to

the general election.



Strategists in both main parties believe that the Tories’ switch away

from press to posters during the 1992 election campaign marked the start

of a trend that will continue at the next election.



In 1992, the Conservatives spent pounds 1.5 million on posters and

pounds 1.1 million on press work, while Labour spent pounds 500,000 and

pounds 1.9 million respectively.



A Labour source said: ‘We will spend much more on posters this time.

They work harder than newspaper ads.’



The Tories’ strategy will be evident in the next two weeks, when they

unveil a pounds 1 million campaign at about 1,500 sites with only a

token back-up effort in the national press.



The push will be the start of a two-pronged strategy recommended by

Maurice Saatchi, under which the Tories will seek to rebuild their

economic credentials before moving on to attack Labour (Campaign, 22

March).



John Major personally approved the forthcoming ads by M&C Saatchi, which

will admit that Britons have been ‘hurt’ by the Government’s tough

economic decisions. But they will assert that the policies have worked.



A Tory official said: ‘We are not saying we are sorry because the

policies were a mistake. But we are sorry that the necessary medicine

caused some pain.’



With Major hoping to delay the election for another year, the pounds 1

million push is a big spend and reflects an improvement in Tory

finances. It is likely to be followed by anti-Labour advertising this

summer.



Tory strategists also believe that posters offer better value for money

than press. One said: ‘We want a heavy presence and they allow us to

reach out to the natural supporters we need to win back.’



The Tories plan to spend at least pounds 5 million on ads at the

election. Labour, which has a budget of pounds 2 million, is holding its

main fire until the election is called.



Topics

Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).