NEWS: TV and posters win trophy for Euro 96 ad revenue outright

While the winner of Euro 96 will not be known until the last kick of the ball on Sunday night, the battle for ad revenue has been won outright by TV and posters, which have left newspapers trailing.

While the winner of Euro 96 will not be known until the last kick of the

ball on Sunday night, the battle for ad revenue has been won outright by

TV and posters, which have left newspapers trailing.



The biggest advertisers and sponsors of Euro 96, including Nike, Reebok,

Snickers, Carslberg-Tetley, Coca-Cola, Umbro and McDonald’s, have opted

almost entirely to put their money into posters and TV.



Part of the reason why national press failed to achieve the ad revenue

windfall that had been expected was that newspapers were less aggressive

and innovative than their counterparts in putting together packages for

Euro 96, according to Richard Bevan, joint media director at Leo

Burnett. Burnetts handles media planning and buying for McDonald’s.



Umbro’s strategy was devised to follow the fans, and the best way of

doing that was to go for the high visibility of posters and TV, Anthony

Clifton, the media account director on Umbro at the Media Centre, said.



A disadvantage for Umbro on the national press front was the perceived

downmarket nature of the majority of people who follow football in the

national press.



Mike Ironside, ad director of the Daily Mail, said Euro 96 was not a big

disappointment. His expectation from the beginning was that the paper

would not make much money out of the championships.



‘There has been tactical advertising,’ he said. ‘The advertisers went

for TV and poster visibility. To run colour spreads with us and others

you are looking at a lot of money. The other aspect is that we are doing

activity for Euro 96 editorially, so in one sense advertisers were

picking up on that activity in other media.’



In a further blow to the newspaper sector, Vauxhall, one of the official

sponsors of Euro 96, pulled its ads from the Daily Mirror and the Daily

Star this week in protest at the tabloids’ controversial coverage of the

run-up to Wednesday’s England versus Germany semi-final.