Nial Ferguson stripped of MD role in Future restructure

Future, the consolidating international media group, has unveiled its new executive management team under chief executive Zillah Byng-Maddick.

Nial Ferguson: moves into a new role of content and marketing director
Nial Ferguson: moves into a new role of content and marketing director

Richard Haley will join as chief finance officer in October, having previously held a number of senior roles at Tesco, while former managing director, Nial Ferguson, moves into a new role of content and marketing director.

Ferguson joined Future from Emap (now Bauer) in March 2008 as group publisher for T3, and was appointed managing director Technology and Film & Games in July 2009.

He was only promoted to group managing director in December 2013 and had been tasked with leading the company’s transition into a predominantly digital business.

However, in May, and after disappointing financial results, the chief finance officer turned chief executive Byng-Maddick declared "Future’s business model isn’t working hard enough".

In other moves announced by Future today, Jeff Turner becomes commercial director for advertising. He brings 16 years experience to the role, including senior commercial roles at Telegraph Media Group and KGB deals.

Paul Layte, previously at Carphone Warehouse, has been appointed commercial director for consumer revenues and will be responsible for circulation, subscriptions, digital editions, trade marketing, affiliates, consumer and product insight, data strategy and international licensing.

Emma Harvey will lead the newly created Product & Technology team, as product and technology director, Michael Venus joins as HR and communications director, and Charlie Speight continues as senior vice president of Future US, having been promoted to the role in April 2014.

Byng-Maddick said: "I am delighted to be working with such a strong team with a wealth of media, retail, and technology experience; this is the right team for the next stage of the Future journey and I am looking forward to working together with them."

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